Woooo! One year of science-art!

It's the Scientific American Blog Network's 1st blogiversary, and it's time to celebrate.

Happy 1st Blogiversary to all #SciAmBlogs! And to us. We're totally eatin' that cherry cheesecake right there.

Here's a bit of what we were up to this past year:

  • 106 posts, average 8.83 posts a month
  • Featured 143 different artists (+/-), with links in our Scumble and Buzz posts to dozens more
  • Artwork by members of 4 different species
  • 280+ comments on the blog, a lot of conversation on Facebook, Twitter and G+.
  • Helped prompt major change in Pinterest's Terms of Service through copyright discussion
  • Exposed the Incredible Hulk
  • Generally partied like rockstars with other science-art rockstars ("please sort out only the raw umber M&M's, I loathe the burnt sienna ones...")

Expect to see a post in coming days indexing everything we've posted so far!

But that's not all.

Put your handprint on the cave wall! Or um, comment instead!

We want to hear from you! Time to put your handprint on the Symbiartic cave wall!

In the tradition of Ed Yong's annual Who Are You? Kalliopi and Glendon (that's us!) would like to know more about our readers.

In the comments below or on Twitter, let us know...

1. Who are you? Pseudonyms and anonymous commenters welcome!

2. What do you do?

3. How'd you find Symbiartic?

4. What kind of science-art do you like? Paleo-art, infographics, bioart, comics, scientific illustration, fine art history or some crazy thing like a fractal pie?

Those questions are just suggestions: paint us a picture, mm-kay?

Team Symbiartic

Thanks everyone for a full-spectrum, colorful year!

-Kalliopi and Glendon

Kalliopi MonoyiosAbout the Author: Kalliopi Monoyios is the illustrator of two popular science books: Neil Shubin’s Your Inner Fish, and Jerry Coyne’s Why Evolution is True. Her illustration portfolio can be found at kalliopimonoyios.com. Follow her on Twitter at @eyeforscience and with co-blogger Glendon Mellow at @symbiartic. Follow on Twitter @symbiartic.