Skip to main content

Blogs

Recent Posts

Select Topic
Tweets In Space Are Go - TODAY!

Tweets In Space Are Go - TODAY!

Tweet it to the stars (well, GJ667C to be precise) A while back I wrote about a wonderful piece of art-meets-science-meets-the-public called Tweets In Space, the brainchild of Nathaniel Stern and Scott Kildall.

September 21, 2012 — Caleb A. Scharf
Magic! Acoustic Levitation of Liquids!

Magic! Acoustic Levitation of Liquids!

Video of the Week #61 September 20th, 2012: From: Acoustic Levitation of Liquids Looks Like Magic by Joanne Manaster at PsiVid . Source: Argonne Labs From Argonne Labs comes this intriguing video demonstrating the acoustic levitation of liquids on a piece of equipment developed for NASA to simulate microgravity conditions.

September 20, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
The IGNOBELS LIVE!

The IGNOBELS LIVE!

Boston! Sci is in you! And I am here at the Sanders Theatre in Cambridge, for the 22nd First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony!!! We've got a live feed of the ceremony ready for you fun and enjoyment, and I'll be live tweeting as well!

September 20, 2012 — Scicurious
Nanotubes Turn Heat into Firepower

Nanotubes Turn Heat into Firepower

One of the biggest barriers to advances in nanotechnology has manipulating objects at such a small scale. Scientists can make balls, rods and tubes that are only billionths of a meter in size—and have developed techniques to get them to self assemble in different patterns—but tweaking the structure of individual nano-scale particles without breaking them down has proved problematic.A technique for creating more flexible nanotubules that pulsate in response to temperature changes could help make these materials easier to work with and reveal new uses for them, according to a team of scientists from Korea's Seoul National University, Japan's Nagoya University and China's Harbin Institute of Technology.

September 20, 2012 — Larry Greenemeier
Bumblebees Quickly Learn Best Paths to Sweet Flowers

Bumblebees Quickly Learn Best Paths to Sweet Flowers

Image courtesy of Andrew Martin Bumblebees, it turns out, don't bumble. Using tiny radar tracking devices, motion-activated cameras and artificial flowers, scientists have learned how the bees themselves quickly learn the best routes to take when they go foraging from flower to flower.

September 20, 2012 — Katherine Harmon
Why We Need to Study the Brain's Evolution in Order to Understand the Modern Mind

Why We Need to Study the Brain's Evolution in Order to Understand the Modern Mind

Image via Wikimedia Commons, adapted from Christopher Walsh, Harvard Medical School, by Gary2863 In the September 17th issue of The New Yorker , Anthony Gottlieb analyzes Homo Mysterious: Evolutionary Puzzles of Human Nature , a new book by David Barash, a psychology professor at the University of Washington in Seattle.

STAFFSeptember 20, 2012 — Ferris Jabr

Blog Index

Scientific American Blog Network

Complex Causes. Alternative Solutions.