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Open Laboratory 2013 submissions so far

Open Laboratory 2013 submissions so far

Less than month till the 2012 edition is out! Mark your calendars for September 18th! The 2012 edition can now be pre-ordered at Amazon.com and Amazon UK.

STAFFAugust 27, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
The Scienceblogging Weekly (August 26th, 2012)

The Scienceblogging Weekly (August 26th, 2012)

The week was too busy to finish this on Friday. Then on Saturday the news broke that Neil Armstrong died - something I wanted to highlight as a special topic - so I decided to wait another day and give people a chance to wrote posts and articles about Neil.

August 26, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
Bora's Picks (August 25th, 2012)

Bora's Picks (August 25th, 2012)

Ranking the medal system: What separates Olympic losers from winners? by Susan E. Matthews: While everyone is figuring out how to fill their time now that the Olympics are over, and others are turning back to Netflix, this year’s summer games gave us many incredible memories of how far the human body can extend itself.

STAFFAugust 25, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
How William Thurston (RIP) Helped Bring About "The Death of Proof"

How William Thurston (RIP) Helped Bring About "The Death of Proof"

William Thurston, who died on August 21 at the age of 65, would have hated this post's headline. Let me tell you why it's justified. In 1993, when I was a full-time staff writer for Scientific American , my boss, Jonathan Piel, asked, or rather, commanded me to write an in-depth feature on something, anything, mathematical.

August 24, 2012 — John Horgan
Ferrets: Man's Other Best Friend

Ferrets: Man's Other Best Friend

If a human points his or her finger at something, a dog might infer that there's hidden food, while the chimpanzee remains more or less clueless about the meaning behind that sort of non-verbal communication.

August 24, 2012 — Jason G. Goldman
#SciAmBlogs Thursday - 19th century Citizen Science, dino parasites, corals on oil rigs, singing gibbons, and more

#SciAmBlogs Thursday - 19th century Citizen Science, dino parasites, corals on oil rigs, singing gibbons, and more

- Caren Cooper - Retro Science – Part 1  - Darren Naish - The war on parasites: the pigeon’s eye view, the oviraptorosaur’s eye view  - Jennifer Frazer - Deep Sea Coral Clings to Oil Platform at Record Gulf Depth  - Gary Stix - A Robot Helps Listen In on Brain Cell Chatter  - Glendon Mellow - Surly Amy and the Charms of Reason  - Khalil A.

STAFFAugust 23, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
A Robot Helps Listen In on Brain Cell Chatter

A Robot Helps Listen In on Brain Cell Chatter

Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1991 for their development of the patch-clamp technique, which records currents coursing through single ion channels in cells.

STAFFAugust 23, 2012 — Gary Stix

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