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Too much red meat can be deadly, study says

Is that extra bite of red meat really going to kill you? If it's your fourth ounce in a day, it might.

People who eat the most red meat daily (about four ounces) are about a third more likely to die over a given decade than those who eat the least (about 19 grams), according to new research set to be published tomorrow in the Archives of Internal Medicine ...

March 23, 2009 — Jordan Lite

All about me: Ability to read one's own facial expressions may be sign of emotional health

SAN FRANCISCO—We may all have a little bit of Narcissus in us. If the mythological figure were a modern-day pretty boy—say a Brad Pitt or a Matt Damon--a neuroscientist might interpret the infatuation with self not as a tragic flaw, but rather as a normal manifestation of the functioning of the superior temporal sulcus, the inferior frontal gyrus or some other brain structure lifted straight out of TV's Grey’s Anatomy ...

March 23, 2009 — Gary Stix

Mount Redoubt erupts

Thar she blows!

Mount Redoubt blew its lid last night and continues to erupt today, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), which has logged at five eruptions so far...

March 23, 2009 — Jordan Lite

Flying home, thinking of the North Pond

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 23, 2009 — Katrina Edwards

Rare star-to-supernova link established

A supernova, or stellar explosion, some 200 million light-years away has been traced to its progenitor star, one of only a few times the source of a supernova has been identified based on pre- and post-supernova images...

March 22, 2009 — John Matson

The end of the trip, with a few surprises in "Dak-horror"

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 22, 2009 — Katrina Edwards

Globe dives into World Water Day

Happy World Water Day! Today is the 16th annual United Nations-sponsored water awareness day. This year's theme "Sharing Waters Sharing Opportunities" aims to up knowledge about all of the bodies of fresh water (263 by the U.N.'s count) that cross – or create – international borders...

March 22, 2009 — Katherine Harmon

Seeing beyond the diffraction limit in 3-D

PITTSBURGH—At a meeting of the American Physical Society (APS) here this past week, physical chemist W. E. Moerner of Stanford University presented a clever new trick for looking inside living cells...

March 21, 2009 — Graham P. Collins

Next stop, Dakar!

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 21, 2009 — Katrina Edwards

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Science or SciFi?

Science or SciFi?

Vanishing Particles. Spooky Action.