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James Watson--yes, that Watson--to discuss...how to train scientists better?

I got an invitation today to a film screening of Naturally Obsessed, The Making of a Scientist . The documentary, by Richard and Carole Rifkind, asks the question, "What does it take to produce the scientists we need to keep America competitive?" That seems like an important question, and one to which Scientific American readers would no doubt like to have the answer...

February 5, 2009 — Ivan Oransky

Do heart scans up cancer risk?

Cardiologists over the past five years have increasingly come to rely on a technology called cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) to locate artery blockages in the heart.

February 4, 2009 — Coco Ballantyne

Alt-energy flagging in recession

It was a banner year for wind-energy in 2008, with the U.S. installing enough wind turbines to power two million homes and surpassing Germany to become the country with the most capability of generating power from wind...

February 4, 2009 — Jordan Lite

Digital TV delay bill on its way to the White House

Just two weeks before a switch to all-digital TV was set to take effect, the House today voted 264 to 158 to delay the move until June 12. This was the second attempt by the Democratic-controlled House to push through the measure, which the Senate easily passed last week (twice) and President Obama has said he will sign into law...

February 4, 2009 — Larry Greenemeier

Next shuttle launch delayed by at least a week

NASA announced yesterday that the launch of space shuttle Discovery, which had been slated for February 12, will be delayed for at least a week.* The space agency said it needs more time to ensure that the valves controlling the flow of hydrogen gas into the external fuel tank do not pose a hazard...

February 4, 2009 — John Matson

Singularity University: You, too, can study the future

Just how special is your intelligence? If you're a unique kind of smarty-pants, you can go to Singularity University, a program launched this week with the lofty intention of tackling "humanity's grand challenges."

Peter Diamandis, a promoter of personal space flight, got the idea while reading Raymond Kurzweil's 2005 book The Singularity Is Near , which discusses the merging and rapidly advancing areas of bio, nano and information technology...

February 4, 2009 — Jordan Lite

Heading home

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the 20th of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com's In-Depth Report on the "Future of the Poles." The entire camp let out a sigh when the last survey flight landed.  Together we had sent the plane t on 52 missions, a distance equivalent to flying twice around the globe.  The survey data now fills two large aluminum boxes that will be shipped back to the U.S...

February 4, 2009 — Robin Bell

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Scientific American Health & Medicine

Scientific American Health & Medicine