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Wiggles and bits--We have data!

Wiggles and bits--We have data!

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the seventh of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--Thanksgiving weekend was long and gray.  All work stopped in the U.S.

December 3, 2008 — Robin Bell
Hawaii: Sunshine, surf—And soon, electric cars

Hawaii: Sunshine, surf—And soon, electric cars

The alt-energy company Better Place, which has taken its vision of electric cars to Israel, Australia, Denmark and major California cities, is now coming to Hawaii.

December 3, 2008 — Jordan Lite
Generic heart drugs as good as brand names

Generic heart drugs as good as brand names

Generic heart medications work just as well as their brand-name counterparts, despite negative commentary on the no-name drugs in medical journals and mainstream media, a new analysis says.

December 2, 2008 — Jordan Lite
Bookshelf science

Bookshelf science

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the sixth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's In-Depth Report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA—For a geologist, Antarctica can be a very frustrating continent.  Stepping off an aircraft onto the ice, one is greeted by a 12,000-foot smoking volcano on one side and a mountain range rising about 14,000 feet on the other.  This would appear to be a geologist's dream.  The problem is the ice.

December 2, 2008 — Robin Bell
Exoplanet orbiting red giant gives hints of Earth's future

Exoplanet orbiting red giant gives hints of Earth's future

Astronomers have discovered a new planet in another solar system orbiting a red giant star that provides clues into what may happen to our own solar system five billion years from now when our own, younger sun becomes a gigantic old star. 

The exoplanet (a planet in another solar system) is about six times the mass of Jupiter and orbits about 40 percent closer to its star, dubbed HD 102272, than Earth does around the sun.

December 2, 2008 — Susannah F. Locke

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