Skip to main content

Blogs

Recent Posts

Select Topic
Forensics labs mostly using unproved science, report says

Forensics labs mostly using unproved science, report says

Fingerprinting and analysis of hair fibers and marks made by weapons are familiar forensic tools to those of us who love crime shows, never mind to criminal defendants on trial and those who say they were wrongly convicted by evidence based on those techniques.

February 19, 2009 — Jordan Lite
Aerogel, aka frozen smoke: An oil spill quicker picker-upper?

Aerogel, aka frozen smoke: An oil spill quicker picker-upper?

Aerogel, a futuristic-sounding lightweight solid sometimes referred to as "frozen smoke," could one day mop up oil spills like one this week in the Irish Sea and filter wastewater because of its super-absorbent, sponge-like qualities.

February 19, 2009 — Jordan Lite
Web legal woes: Forget <i>Facebook,</i> the real controversy is flatulence

Web legal woes: Forget Facebook, the real controversy is flatulence

We at 60-Second Science apologize in advance for some of the bathroom and otherwise juvenile humor that appears in this post. But do keep reading.

Last week Apple iPhone software maker InfoMedia, Inc., filed suit in a Colorado district court to get competitor Air-o-Matic, Inc., to stop threatening InfoMedia with a lawsuit.

February 19, 2009 — Larry Greenemeier
Harder than a diamond? Survey says...

Harder than a diamond? Survey says...

In addition to being the traditional token of marital intent, the diamond has long provided the—ahem—gold standard for super-hard materials.

February 19, 2009 — John Matson
Fetal stem cells cause tumor in a teenage boy

Fetal stem cells cause tumor in a teenage boy

In May 2001, Israeli parents of a nine-year old boy with a crippling disease that left him wheelchair-bound took their child to see doctors in Moscow.

February 19, 2009 — Coco Ballantyne

Blog Index

Scientific American Blog Network

Help Us Reforest the Mississippi River Valley