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Do Our Bonds With Animals Survive Death?

Grover Krantz was onto something when he had his remains donated to science. A professor of anthropology, he didn't see why death should interrupt his life-long teaching.

October 17, 2014 — Julie Hecht

Scientific American Science in Action Winner Kenneth Shinozuka

It’s no secret to Scientific American readers that we feel a special obligation to support the next generation of science enthusiasts, whom we hope to inspire both with our science coverage and our education initiatives, including the Scientific American Science in Action Award, powered by the Google Science Fair...

STAFFOctober 9, 2014 — Mariette DiChristina

Is Kindness Physically Attractive?

One of the most robust findings in social psychology is the beauty-is-good stereotype: physically attractive people are perceived and treated more positively than physically unattractive people [1]...

October 9, 2014 — Scott Barry Kaufman

Chimp-Violence Researchers Respond to Criticism on Cross-Check

Is chimpanzee violence a product of nature or nurture? Genes or environment? Two weeks ago Nature published a report, "Lethal aggression in Pan is better explained by adaptive strategies than human impacts," in which 30 primatologists came down on the side of nature...

October 1, 2014 — John Horgan

How a Dog Aced the Verbal Section of the Canine SAT

Chaser, a Border Collie from South Carolina, knows the names of over 1,000 different objects. Does anyone find themselves looking at their tail-wagging friend and wondering, "Well, what do you know?" When it comes to whether dogs can understand words, Chaser—the subject of not one, but two scientific publications—can attest that the answer is: Yes...

September 30, 2014 — Julie Hecht

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