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"herpetology"

Australia, land of dragons (part II)

Australia, land of dragons (part II)

Time for more Australian agamids, or amphibolurines, or dragons, whichever you prefer. Last time round, we looked at the water dragons, Moloch and a few other taxa, meaning that all thats left to get through is the remainder.

February 7, 2014 — Darren Naish

Hell yes: Komodo dragons!!! (again)

What with all the monitor-themed goodness around these parts lately (see links below), it seems only fitting that I provide a re-vamped, substantially updated version of this Tet Zoo ver 2 classic (originally published in September 2007).

March 5, 2014 — Darren Naish

The Galliwasps

Diploglossines – popularly called galliwasps – are an extant group of anguid lizards that inhabit South and Central America as well as the Antilles (Anguidae is the group that includes alligator lizards, slow-worms, glass lizards and kin). Most galliwasps are robust-bodied lizards with normally proportioned, complete limbs. A reduced digit count and reduced limb size is, however, present in the obscure taxa OphiodesSauresia and Wetmorena. The vast majority of species are included within Celestus (with about 30 species) and Diploglossus (with about 17 species).

September 9, 2015 — Darren Naish

Turtles I Have Recently Seen

TURTLES! A section of the montage that's being prepared for the Tet Zoo Big Book (larger version viewable at my patreon). Image in-prep, by Darren Naish.

June 3, 2015 — Darren Naish

By the Horns of Trioceros, the Casque of Calumma, the Brood of Bradypodion--Chameleons, Part 2

Welcome to the second part of the ‘What’s with all these new chameleon names?’ series. In the previous article, we looked at the fact that the ‘two genera system’ widely in use prior to the 1990s started to fall apart during the 1980s; we also looked specifically at the chameleon genera Rhampholeon and Rieppeleon. This time round—surprise surprise—we look at... more chameleons

February 25, 2016 — Darren Naish

The Biology of Sirens

Sirens build nests, have beaks, eat plants and have a history of "size shuffling"--they're incredible!

June 15, 2016 — Darren Naish

The Terrible Leaf Walker Frog

One of the most terrifying frogs in existence is bright yellow, social, reasonably intelligent (for a frog), and one of the biggest members of its group...

May 18, 2017 — Darren Naish

Skinks skinks skinks (part I)

Skinks (properly Scincidae… though read on) are one of the most successful of squamate groups, accounting for approximately 1500 species - in other words, for about 25% of all lizards.

October 10, 2014 — Darren Naish

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