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Tetrapod Zoology

Tetrapod Zoology

Amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals - living and extinct

Bird behaviour, the ‘deep time’ perspective

Bird behaviour, the ‘deep time’ perspective

The behaviour of long-extinct animals remains an area of major public and scientific interest the great perennial problem being that were always massively constrained, if not crippled, by a frustrating lack of data.

January 27, 2014 — Darren Naish
Grassland earless dragons

Grassland earless dragons

Today: LIZARDS. Even better: obscure Australian agamids, or dragon lizards, or dragons, if you prefer. Ive written about agamids a few times on Tet Zoo but have never gotten to say much (if anything) about the Australian radiation, grouped together into the clade Amphibolurinae.

January 4, 2014 — Darren Naish
Of vole plagues and hip glands

Of vole plagues and hip glands

Youll already know what voles are. Theyre blunt-nosed, comparatively short-tailed rodents with chunky bodies and rounded ears that are mostly concealed by fur.

January 1, 2014 — Darren Naish
A Squamotastic Christmas at Tet Zoo

A Squamotastic Christmas at Tet Zoo

My plan was to get something else finished for Tet Zoo before Christmas but, alas, that just wasn’t possible. So here’s this… And for those of you who want to see more detail, here are enlarged versions… And for all of you Squamozoic fans who need a labelled version… For more on the Squamozoic go [...]

December 21, 2013 — Darren Naish
Were azhdarchid pterosaurs really terrestrial stalkers? The evidence says yes, yes they (probably) were

Were azhdarchid pterosaurs really terrestrial stalkers? The evidence says yes, yes they (probably) were

Regular Tet Zoo readers will be familiar with azhdarchid pterosaurs and the debate thats surrounded their ecology and behaviour. Within recent decades, these remarkable, often gigantic, long-necked, long-billed but proportionally short-winged toothless Cretaceous pterosaurs have been imagined as mega-skimmers, as heron-like waders, as obligate scavengers of dinosaur carcasses, and even as sandpiper-like littoral foragers.

December 15, 2013 — Darren Naish

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