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Symbiartic

Symbiartic

The art of science and the science of art.

Meet the future of photography

Meet the future of photography

Before you draw conclusions from my recent post that I am some bitter photography-hater, I want to set the record straight. I am not a photography-hater (although I reserve the right to be a stock-photography-stealing-good-illustration-opportunities hater), and to prove it to you, I want to introduce you to the future of photography.

July 28, 2011 — Kalliopi Monoyios
To © is Human

To © is Human

Pierre Brassault. Tillie Cheddar. Luk Khang. What do these artists have in common? Their work is open source, and completely open to reproduce without copyright protection.

July 26, 2011 — Glendon Mellow
The DNA Hall of Shame

The DNA Hall of Shame

Confession time. Illustrators are people, too. And by that I mean they bring assumptions to the table at the outset of every project. There’s no avoiding it - no matter how educated and experienced you are, you can’t know it all.

July 25, 2011 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Science-art Scumble

Science-art Scumble

Scumble: "A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through."From The Artist's Handbook , by Ray Smith.Welcome to the first Science-Art Scumble here on Scientific American!

July 24, 2011 — Glendon Mellow
Magic Beans

Magic Beans

Scientific illustration is an artistic enterprise built with standard models, a history of discarded models, and conservative visual language. Conservative visual language is necessary: faced with complex systems, like say, the respiration system of a healthy human, the scientific illustrator clears away the visual noise of too much blood, muscle skin and even organs to highlight the necessary parts of the body a respirologist or surgeon needs to be concerned with.

July 22, 2011 — Glendon Mellow
The Dudley Bug

The Dudley Bug

One of the things that fascinates me most about the current state of science-based art, are the roots we can retroactively look to in pre-scientific eras.

July 20, 2011 — Glendon Mellow
5 Reasons Your Camera Won't Steal My Job

5 Reasons Your Camera Won't Steal My Job

By far the most common question I get when I tell people that I am a scientific illustrator is one variation (some more tactful than others) of, “They still use illustrators?

July 12, 2011 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Science-Art: don't call it "Art"

Science-Art: don't call it "Art"

Don’t talk about “Art”There’s often a lot of confusion when talking about art. “Art” is a word that can be conflated to mean many things: but most often what people mean when discussing visual art, (oh look I’m already putting a qualifier on the term) is Fine Art.For example, scientific illustration is not fine art: you may find people trying to justify astonishing images from the Hubble or an electron microscope as being worthy of an art gallery, and indeed they are.

July 7, 2011 — Glendon Mellow
Visual beings: meet Symbiartic

Visual beings: meet Symbiartic

If you're old enough to remember when people actually read paper newspapers, you might remember when The New York Times switched from a black and white newspaper to a color newspaper.

July 5, 2011 — Kalliopi Monoyios

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SymbiarticThe art of science and the science of art.

Confronting Common Wisdom