Skip to main content
SA Visual

SA Visual

Illustrating science since 1845

STAFF BLOG
Don’t Just Visualize Data—Visceralize It

Don’t Just Visualize Data—Visceralize It

The title of this post borrows from ideas presented by Sha Hwang at the Visualized conference in New York City several weeks ago: He kicked off the data-visualization event with a talk that—in effect—challenged the audience to take a step back.

STAFFFebruary 18, 2014 — Jen Christiansen
4 Ways to Venus: An Artist's Assignment

4 Ways to Venus: An Artist's Assignment

Irving Geis (1908-1997) is probably best known for illustrations of biological macromolecules, such as his groundbreaking watercolor painting of myoglobin—an exhaustive and beautiful portrait of the first properly sorted protein molecule.

STAFFJanuary 23, 2014 — Jen Christiansen

How I Reconciled My Love for Art and Science

In college in the 1990s, I suffered an identity crisis. Was I a scientist or an artist? I loved the clarity and order inherent to the scientific process; ask questions, set up methodologies, collect data, analyze.

STAFFJanuary 7, 2014 — Jen Christiansen
Scientific American Graphics Win 3 Bronze Medals at Malofiej

Scientific American Graphics Win 3 Bronze Medals at Malofiej

Last week, the world information graphics community convened in Pamplona, Spain, for the 21st annual Malofiej International Infographics Summit and Awards, organized by the Spanish chapter of the Society for News Design.

STAFFMarch 18, 2013 — Jen Christiansen

Storytelling with Big Data: Thoughts on VISUALIZED

As an attendee at the inaugural VISUALIZED conference last week in New York City, I was ready to experience, as the website described, “an inspiring two-day gathering with the brightest minds and social innovators from around the world who are changing how we understand and interact with data; and gain insight into designing data-driven narratives [...]

STAFFNovember 14, 2012 — Jen Christiansen

Blog Index