Skip to main content

"science"

The Science of Growing Smarter with Annie Murphy Paul

Science writer Annie Murphy Paul’s fresh perspective on intelligence and personality prompt a heart-to-heart about learning, intelligence assessments, growth mindsets and rethinking intelligence.

November 24, 2014 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Is There Anything the Mimic Octopus *Can’t* Do?

Is There Anything the Mimic Octopus *Can’t* Do?

According to science comic, xkcd, the answer is no: For the past 25 days, we have been showing off a different artist each day who is working at the intersection of science and art.

September 26, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
This Image is Not Photoshopped

This Image is Not Photoshopped

It would be easy enough to photoshop a geometric pattern onto an image of a waterfall, and if that was how this image had been created I would still have nodded in appreciation of the originality and execution.

September 2, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Our Microbial Organ – The Good and Bad Bugs of the Human Gut

Ever since coming to Harvard, I’ve been involved with a graduate student group called “Science in the News.” At SITN, the goal is to bring the fascination with scientists that graduate students have to a wider audience, and the flagship effort of the group is a series of lectures held every Autumn and Spring that [...]

November 25, 2013 — Kevin Bonham
GMO Labeling, I-522, and Why This Debate Sucks for Progressive Scientists Like Me

GMO Labeling, I-522, and Why This Debate Sucks for Progressive Scientists Like Me

I’m a granola (and dirt)-eating, tree-hugging, liberal/progressive. If I was called by a pollster asking about the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), I’d be counted among the folks that disapprove, but only because I think it doesn’t go far enough (I’m for single-payer, but I could have settled for the public option).

November 8, 2013 — Kevin Bonham
Turns Out There IS Something New Under the Sun

Turns Out There IS Something New Under the Sun

If there is anything new under the sun it has to be this – and delightfully, it’s the domain of the moon. This spectacular table by Adrien Segal captures tidal data collected from San Francisco Bay for the duration of a full lunar cycle, 29 days in April and May of 2006.

September 18, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Can Machines Produce Art that Moves Us?

This happens more often than you’d think: You tell someone you are an illustrator. They ask you a few questions and then get to what’s really on their mind: “So, do you do all your work on the computer or do you draw everything by hand?” When you respond that you do some (or all) [...]

May 19, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on... it's about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

May 22, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
The Perfect 46: The Future is Near

The Perfect 46: The Future is Near

Visit theperfect46.com, and it looks like any business web page. The Perfect 46 purports to be a company that uses the power of genomics, the information stored in the entirety of your DNA–your genome–to determine if you are with “the one” for you.

April 21, 2014 — Joanne Manaster
Will Enjoying ‘Cosmos’ Depend On If You Liked Science In School?

Will Enjoying ‘Cosmos’ Depend On If You Liked Science In School?

Tonight’s TV line-up has science enthusiasts quite excited. Of course I’m talking about Cosmos as presented by Neil DeGrasse Tyson, produced by Seth MacFarlane (of Family Guy fame) and written by Ann Druyan, Carl Sagan’s widow and co-creator of the original series.

March 9, 2014 — Joanne Manaster

This Is What We Don’t Know About The Universe

In recent days I’ve had some interesting conversations. There’s a giddiness going around, related to an outpouring of science love – the kind you get from President Obama introducing TV science shows, the kind that has wonderful visuals, but is, well, a wee bit simplistic (a sin that none of us could ever, ever be [...]

March 12, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf

The Need for Belonging in Math and Science

From her earliest memories, Catherine Good was good at math. By second grade she was performing at the fourth grade level, sometimes even helping the teacher grade other students’ work.

October 21, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman