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Expeditions

Expeditions

At last, people moving!

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the tenth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA-- Just 24 hours ago, all the teams were pinned down on Antarctic coasts by weather, equipment and bureaucracy.

December 10, 2008 — Robin Bell

Audacious Plans, Nasty Weather

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the ninth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles."   McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--Sometimes I wonder why we were so audacious to plan a project that required decent spring weather in several places around the entire Antarctic continent.  Our weather delays are accumulating.  The first delay was when the British plane was pinned down by storms, first in Patagonia and then at Rothera on the Antarctic Peninsula.

December 9, 2008 — Robin Bell

Old bones and socks

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the eighth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's In-Depth Report on the "Future of the Poles." CAPE EVANS, ANTARCTICA—The first weekend we were here “on the ice,” we had an opportunity to travel up the coast about 18 miles.  The annual sea ice is six feet thick, and we would be transported on top of this in a giant orange vehicle with wheels five feet tall, called a Delta.

December 4, 2008 — Robin Bell

Wiggles and bits--We have data!

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the seventh of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--Thanksgiving weekend was long and gray.  All work stopped in the U.S.

December 3, 2008 — Robin Bell

Bookshelf science

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the sixth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's In-Depth Report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA—For a geologist, Antarctica can be a very frustrating continent.  Stepping off an aircraft onto the ice, one is greeted by a 12,000-foot smoking volcano on one side and a mountain range rising about 14,000 feet on the other.  This would appear to be a geologist's dream.  The problem is the ice.

December 2, 2008 — Robin Bell

Thanksgiving Day (in Antarctica) blizzard

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the fifth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA -- In the U.S.

December 1, 2008 — Robin Bell

Moving the Chess Pieces

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the fourth of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com 's In-depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--Ever since we first conceived of this project, the logistics have been complex.

December 1, 2008 — Robin Bell

A shoveling scientific community

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the third of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com's In-depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--The stereotype of a scientist is a solitary figure in a white lab coat manipulating chemicals alone late in the night.  Supporting this lone crusader for science are legions of others who work to make the laboratory function.

November 24, 2008 — Robin Bell

A flight to a continent dressed in white

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the second of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com 's In-Depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND—The flight from the land of green to the land of white may be within our grasp today.  Everything seems to be working.  The van showed up at the allocated time.  The check in process went quickly.

November 21, 2008 — Robin Bell

Getting to Antarctica--Or not

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the first of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com 's In-depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND (11/16/08)--Things have improved since the days of ship and dog sleds, but it still is not easy to get to the center of Antarctica.

November 18, 2008 — Robin Bell

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