I am so super busy at the moment because someone decided, a long time ago, that Adelaide should do all of the things in March. We have car races, Fringe festivals, multi-arts festivals, my wife’s birthday :)

fringe "pre launch"

The kind of thing you see during the Fringe. Astronaut in a tutu like it aint no thang. Photo Credit: MikeBlogs

 

It’s because of this I am worked to the bone as the organisation I work for/with possess a state of the art venue and TV studio. We are putting on science shows throughout the Fringe Festival that educate and entertain, sometime with more emphasis on the entertainment. Check out the shows below and if you can make it to one, book a ticket and if you can’t get in touch with the acts and bring them to your town. Then thank me later.

(The whole list is here.)

Sepia

For Neil, the South Australian coastal town of Whyalla is a place of hidden beauty. Just a short drive from his caravan park, a few metres under the water, are hundreds of thousands of cuttlefish, Sepia apama, in their natural breeding ground.

But now things are changing. The cuttlefish are going missing; and Neil is finding his family is further away than ever.

Can Whyalla still be all he thought it could be?

Written by Emily Steel, the writer of Rocket Town and winner of the Adelaide Fringe 2011 inSPACE:development award.

Directed by Nescha Jelk, winner of the 2011 Helpmann Academy Bendigo and Adelaide Bank Award.

Featuring Matthew Gregan, Holly Myers and Rory Walker.

 

The Fame Algorithm

What’s maths been good for? Physics? Chemistry? Economics? BORING! Finally maths is being used for stuff that matters… Popularity! Entertainment! LOLcats!

Simon Pampena, the angry mathematician, is your guide on maths’ modern adventure to the dark side.

 

Your Days Are Numbered: The maths of comedy

Drinking is good for you. Being single is bad for you. You have a 0.000043% chance of dying during this show.

After sell-out performances at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, comedian Timandra Harkness and stand up mathematician Matt Parker will make sure you die laughing.

 

Faraday’s Candle

Over 150 years ago, Michael Faraday saw beauty and wonder in the chemistry of a candle. Society has changed, technology has advanced, language has evolved, but the phenomena underpinning a candle remain constant. Built around one man’s genius for observation, Faraday’s candle explores natural phenomena and the processes of science.

 

City Farm

It is 2030 and the air is different. Humans are wealthy and celebrating their indulgent lifestyles, but the natural world is suffering. Technology has allowed for most things to be replaced electronically. But can we replace everything? Grass, flowers, trees, wind, sun… Earth?

Follow the journey of Jed and Melaleuca, a farmer and his tree. Their bond could be the beginning of a new world… or will it be just a reminder of how life used to be?