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Anthropology in Practice

Anthropology in Practice

Exploring the human condition.

On My Shelf: Geologic City (A Review)

On My Shelf: Geologic City (A Review)

Ed Note: "On My Shelf" is my review series, covering notable books and events. For more notables, please see the reviews still housed at the old home of Anthropology in Practice.

September 12, 2011 — Krystal D'Costa
Remembering With Baseball

Remembering With Baseball

Unfurling the flag at CitiField September 11, 2011. Credit: KDCosta Don't tell me about the world. Not today. It's springtime and they're knocking baseball around fields where the grass is damp and green in the morning and the kids are trying to hit the curve ball.

September 11, 2011 — Krystal D'Costa
Pieces of the Human Evolutionary Puzzle: Who Was Australopithecus sediba?

Pieces of the Human Evolutionary Puzzle: Who Was Australopithecus sediba?

Courtesy of Steven Churchill, Duke University. Few things remain as mysterious—or controversial—as our own history as a species. However, a series of papers released in Science may add another piece to the puzzle: Four papers draw back the curtain on Australopithecus sediba, announced earlier this year, detailing morphological features of the hand, foot, pelvis, and skull that may establish this species within the ancestral lineage of modern humans.In a subterranean cave at Malapa, South Africa, approximately 25 miles (40km) from Johannesburg, the remains of numerous hominins identified as Australopithecus sediba have lain between layers of flowstone—a type of rock that forms in caves, similar in composition to stalagmites and stalactites, except as the name implies, this rock forms in a layer that “flows” across the surface.

September 9, 2011 — Krystal D'Costa
Whose Name Is It Anyway?

Whose Name Is It Anyway?

'Tis but thy name that is my enemy;Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.What's Montague? it is nor hand, nor foot,Nor arm, nor face, nor any other partBelonging to a man.

September 7, 2011 — Krystal D'Costa
Is The Grass Always Greener?

Is The Grass Always Greener?

I've watched this video several times since @PetiteSam first shared it, and each time I'm struck by the simple message that we're never quite satisfied.

September 6, 2011 — Krystal D'Costa
The Truth in Pictures: Disasters in the Digital Age

The Truth in Pictures: Disasters in the Digital Age

Hurricane Irene over the Bahamas. For two days Hurricane Irene pounded the coast of the Eastern United States. Though she was ultimately downgraded to a tropical storm, the damage from flooding and downed branches left no doubt as to the power she commanded: washed out roads and rail lines, flooded homes, and widespread power failures left millions trying to pick up the pieces.Not surprisingly, New Yorkers were skeptical of Irene's impact ahead of her arrival.

September 5, 2011 — Krystal D'Costa
Editor's Selections: Acheulian Axes, Skull Fragments, and Penis Spines

Editor's Selections: Acheulian Axes, Skull Fragments, and Penis Spines

This week from ResearchBlogging.org: With breaking news about our evolutionary history, Zach of Lawn Chair Anthropology delivers a nice summary concerning reports of what may be the oldest Acheulian tools found, and questions the ways stone tools have been assigned to particular taxonomies given the histories we do know (or think we do).

September 1, 2011 — Krystal D'Costa

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