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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive

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Military Strategy, 1914: Avoid a Knockout Blow

Military Strategy, 1914: Avoid a Knockout Blow

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: October 31, 1914 The articles by “The Military Correspondent of the Scientific American” were probably written by an American army officer...

STAFFOctober 31, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Censorship and Armored Cars, Circa 1914

Censorship and Armored Cars, Circa 1914

This Week in World War I: October 17, 1914 The cover wrap of the issue has a painting of an armored car, charging into—surely not running away from!—some battle, gun blazing...

STAFFOctober 17, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

Aerial Spying, 100 Years before Drones

Reported in Scientific American This Week in World War I: October 10, 1914 Drones are at the forefront of warfare in the 21st century. These unarmed and unpiloted aircraft, big and small, circle far above the battlefield, collecting images and reporting back to headquarters, electronically...

STAFFOctober 10, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
The Dash of Cavalry in the Great War

The Dash of Cavalry in the Great War

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: October 3, 1914 The opening weeks of the First World War saw sweeping movements of vast armies.

STAFFOctober 3, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Antwerp, 1914: New Technology, Civilian Targets

Antwerp, 1914: New Technology, Civilian Targets

Reported in Scientific American—This Week in World War I: September 19, 1914 The Belgian field army retreated into the fortified city of Antwerp only 16 days after the Germans had invaded...

STAFFSeptember 26, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Needs of the New War: Fresh Aviators and Novel Tactics

Needs of the New War: Fresh Aviators and Novel Tactics

Reported in Scientific American: This Week in World War I: September 19, 1914 The first few weeks of the Great War in Europe had convincingly shown the value of aircraft for reconnaissance work...

STAFFSeptember 19, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
First Sea Battle of World War I

First Sea Battle of World War I

Reported in Scientific American this Week in World War I: September 12, 1914 The Battle of Heligoland Bight took place in the North Sea on August 28, 1914.

STAFFSeptember 12, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

This Week in World War I: September 5, 1914

Censored: How the Army Eats In this issue, a telling line reads: "The censors have not allowed the press of the world to state whether or not explosives were dropped on the fortifications of Liège." This special "War Issue" contained much on military theory, organization and resources, but apart from a scattering of images little [...]..

STAFFSeptember 5, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
This Week in World War I: August 29, 1914

This Week in World War I: August 29, 1914

A Monstrous Paradox In the late 19th and early 20th century before the Great War broke out, Germany (which had become unified only in 1871) could be held up as a shining example of how science and the arts (philosophy, music, painting) could help a country prosper, grow and become civilized...

STAFFAugust 29, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
This Week in World War I: August 22, 1914

This Week in World War I: August 22, 1914

The Vast Scale of War When the Great War broke out the scale of it was unprecedented. Citizens, soldiers and governments alike tried to grasp the sheer immense numbers of combatants and materièl involved...

STAFFAugust 22, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

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