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Anecdotes from the Archive

Anecdotes from the Archive

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An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part III)

An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part III)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 9, 1915 In this issue of Scientific American from 1915, we published the last installment of a three-part account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: A Battle in the Clouds," by Frederick C...

STAFFJanuary 9, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part II)

An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part II)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 2, 1915 In this issue of Scientific American from 1915, we published the second installment of a three-part first-hand account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: Patrol of the Sky" by Frederick C...

STAFFJanuary 2, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 26, 1914 In this issue of Scientific American from 1914, we published the first installment of a three-part first-hand account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: The Diary of an American Volunteer With the Aviation Corps of the French Army," by Frederick C...

STAFFDecember 26, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

Ramming a Submarine, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 19, 1914 Scientific American in 1914 sometimes used large, single-theme images for the issue cover.

STAFFDecember 19, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 12, 1914 Here's a short, cryptic note from our December 12, 1914, issue, about scientific work being carried out in the Middle East: "Survey of Southern Palestine.—A considerable amount of surveying and exploration has recently been done along the southern frontier of Palestine under [...]..

STAFFDecember 12, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Battleships and Diplomacy, 1914

Battleships and Diplomacy, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 5, 1914 Two ships from the German navy had an outsize part in the history of the First World War: the Goeben and Breslau...

STAFFDecember 5, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Battleship Disaster Coverup, 1914

Battleship Disaster Coverup, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: November 28, 1914 On this date 100 years ago Scientific American reported on the sinking of HMS Audacious, one of the British Royal Navy's most modern "dreadnoughts"—the largest and most powerful battleships in existance in 1914...

STAFFNovember 28, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

Care of the Wounded, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: November 21, 1914 From the Scientific American Supplement issue of November 21, 1914, we note, "The first object of an army in war is to disperse or destroy the enemy, but a correlative duty is the care of its own men when wounded or otherwise [...]..

STAFFNovember 21, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

The Ferocity of Artillery, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: November 14, 1914 The tactical use of artillery had been evolving in the years before the Great War: In South Africa in the Anglo-Boer War of 1899-1902 the British developed the concept of the "creeping barrage," where a curtain of shellfire proceeded just in front [...]..

STAFFNovember 14, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
The Surprisingly Lethal Submarine, 1914

The Surprisingly Lethal Submarine, 1914

Reported in Scientific American this week in World War I, November 7, 1914 Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz, the man who built up the Imperial Navy of Germany, had dismissed submarines as a waste of money back in 1901...

STAFFNovember 7, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

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