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No rats in Ryder Alley

Last week, in the wake of superstorm Sandy, I saw a number of people asking questions on social media (and some traditional media picking up on it) about a potential for ratpocalypse, i.e,...

November 5, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic

Newer Docs Might Be Driving Up Health Care Costs

Health care spending increases have slowed over the past couple years. Still, we are spending some $2.6 trillion—that's trillion with a "T"—a year on health costs, which is a higher percentage of our GDP than any other developed country...

November 5, 2012 — Katherine Harmon

The Death of Natural Selection

My evening plan to read Harry Potter for the first time (I know!) was thwarted by Linton Weeks’s thought-provoking post on the right of plants to evolve.

November 5, 2012 — Laura Jane Martin

Chimps in Uganda: Lessons from Washoe

October 30th marked the five-year anniversary of the death of my friend Washoe. Washoe was a wonderful friend. She was confident and self-assured. She was a matriarch, a mother figure not only to her adopted son but to others as well...

November 4, 2012 — Maureen McCarthy

New York City Marathon Runs Anyway

The 2012 New York City Marathon may not be televised, but it is being organized on an unofficial basis by men and women who have banded together to run anyway.

November 4, 2012 — Christine Gorman

How to milk a pigeon

Milk is produced by mammals in order to provide nutrition to their growing young. It's pretty special stuff, as not only does it provide all the nutrients and energy needed to fuel a growing baby (consider that for at least six months a human infant drinks nothing but milk) it also aids in the development of both the immune system and the baby's microbiotica - the bacteria that develop in its gut and stomach.Although milk is exclusively a mammalian production, some birds, such as pigeons, penguins and flamingos, produce a milk-like substance which provides similar benefits to their young...

November 4, 2012 — S.E. Gould

Kids' Science Books for Stormy Weather

Like many families in the path of superstorm Sandy, we’ve spent much of the last week indoors trying to stay sane. Fortunately, we live in a part of Brooklyn that was spared the worst storm damage, so I had the luxury of finally reading the children's science books that have been piling up on my desk at work...

November 3, 2012 — Anna Kuchment

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