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How NASA plans to quell Ares 1 rocket vibrations

How NASA plans to quell Ares 1 rocket vibrations

The last thing you want on a flight to the moon is a headache.

That's why NASA engineers have been working to figure out how to reduce vibrations predicted to occur in the Ares 1 rocket, a multi-stage launch vehicle that plays an early role in the space agency's Constellation program to return to the moon by 2020.

August 19, 2008 — JR Minkel
Peak water crisis dominates World Water Week

Peak water crisis dominates World Water Week

The world is getting thirstier, and drier. More than 2,500 experts from around the world will discuss the issues facing one of the world's most precious natural resources at World Water Week this week in Stockholm, from the millions of gallons of water hidden inside biofuels to the ongoing scandal of poor sanitation.

August 18, 2008 — David Biello
With gadgets like these to work with, no wonder Julia Child quit the spy game

With gadgets like these to work with, no wonder Julia Child quit the spy game

The National Archives' recent decision to open more than 35,000 official personnel files of men and women who served in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS)—the U.S.'s intelligence agency during World War II and the precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)—has shed new light on the roles that chef Julia Child, actor Sterling Hayden, 1950 Nobel Peace Prize winner Ralph Bunche and others played during the early days of American espionage.

August 15, 2008 — Larry Greenemeier
Star Wars: The Clone Wars hits theaters today

Star Wars: The Clone Wars hits theaters today

The latest film in the Star Wars saga is now at multiplexes nationwide, taking moviegoers back to that far, far away galaxy for a fresh dose of epic space battles between cloned soldiers and robotic armies.

August 15, 2008 — Adam Hadhazy
MIT hackers make Massachusetts officials nervous at Defcon

MIT hackers make Massachusetts officials nervous at Defcon

The annual Defcon computer security conference might be relabeled as the Woodstock of corporate paranoia.

It seems like almost every year one or more academic researchers gets in trouble with the law for presenting a paper that corporations contend will result in security breaches that will bring on Armageddon.

August 14, 2008 — Gary Stix
Lightweight aluminum v. a hand grenade, who wins?

Lightweight aluminum v. a hand grenade, who wins?

Concrete and steel are the materials of choice when building buildings and vehicles that will protect soldiers from enemy fire. But a group of Norwegian researchers are testing another option: lightweight aluminum panels that can be filled with densely packed dirt, gravel, sand or any other nearby substance to provide protection without adding a lot of weight to a military's vehicles or structures, according to a recent report in the Norwegian research magazine Gemini .

August 14, 2008 — Larry Greenemeier

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