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Tech award winners focus on putting gadgetry to good use worldwide

The Tech Museum of Innovation today named 25 laureates as winners of its 2008 Tech Award for using technology to "benefit humanity and spark global change." The awards are broken down into five categories (education, equality, environment, economic development and health); Tech Awards executive director Lee Wilkerson says that in November one winner in each category will receive a $50,000 cash prize during an awards ceremony in San Jose, Calif.

September 9, 2008 — Larry Greenemeier

LHC to switch on early tomorrow amid death threats

Heads up, science fiends and night owls: The greatest science experiment ever built is set to switch on at around 3:30 A.M. Eastern time tomorrow.

After 14 years and $8 billion, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) plans to inject the first beam of protons fully around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the circular particle accelerator 17 miles (27 kilometers) long straddling the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva.

September 9, 2008 — JR Minkel

Honda unleashes the Insight, its ''Prius-fighter''

In advance of the Paris International Auto Show in early October, Honda has released photos of its new entry-level hybrid car, which the press has (naturally) labeled the “Prius-fighter.” Reports indicate the Insight, a five-door family hatchback that is scheduled to hit dealership floors worldwide next year, is to be priced around $18,000, some $3,000 less than Toyota’s vaunted Prius gasoline-electric hybrid.

September 7, 2008 — Steve Ashley

A new iPod on the horizon? Rock on

Is a new Apple music player -- or players -- on the way? The buzz around the company's cryptic invitations to a "Let's Rock" event is that it's about to unveil a new iPod, or possibly an upgrade of the entire product line.

September 3, 2008 — Jordan Lite

Is China's pollution a problem for the U.S.?

You may have read some alarming stories recently about pollution making its way from China to the U.S. Should you worry?

In fact, a cloud of soot, sulfur dioxide and sand from China’s Gobi Desert does make it to cities of the western U.S., where it accounts for, by some measures, as much as 15 percent of local air pollution.

September 3, 2008 — David Biello

Who gets the most spam? This message brought to you by the letter "A"

If your e-mail address begins “ajolie@” or “mphelps," your inbox is likely overflowing with messages sporting subject lines that read “Your Lady Will Become Crayzed” (sic) or “Urgent Request for Business Relationship from Lagos, Nigeria.” Believe it or not, the spam load has nothing to do with celebrity and everything to do with the first letter in your e-mail address.

September 3, 2008 — Gary Stix

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