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The Network Central

#SciAmBlogs Thursday - psychedelic shrimp, in a galaxy far away, dinosaur egg-shells, and more.

- Dana Hunter - Prelude to a Catastrophe: “One of the Most Active and Most Explosive Volcanoes in the Cascade Range” - Khalil A. Cassimally - EUSci: Student Science Magazine of the University of Edinburgh - Dylan Giordano - USC Dornsife Scientific Diving: Preserving Palau’s Resources through Protected Area Networks - Ian Underwood and Paul Germano - MSU Dinosaurs: Team Strider – Eggshell Thickness Variance - Jesse Bering - My Other Whereabouts - Krystal D'Costa - Editor’s Selections: Colors and Stuttering - John Matson - Astronomers Identify Very Distant (But Not the Most Distant) Galaxy - Katherine Harmon - This Psychedelic Shrimp Will Get You Hammered [Video] =======================Conversations on our articles and blog posts often continue on our Facebook page - "Like" it and join in the discussion...

STAFFJune 7, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
The Network Central

#SciAmBlogs Wednesday - outreach, jellyfish, Zoobiquity, deformed dino eggs, Ray Bradbury, last shuttle ride, coffee, Transit of Venus and more.

Enjoy the regular Wednesday feature - the new Video of the Week.- Kate Clancy - Which came first, rewarding outreach or doing it? On chickens, eggs, and overworked scientists - Scicurious - On Outreach: Academia needs an attitude adjustment - Roxi Aslan - USC Dornsife Scientific Diving: Jellyfish Lake - Anita Moore-Nall - MSU Dinosaurs: deformations in eggs - Bora Zivkovic - ScienceOnline2012 – interview with Kathryn Bowers - Caleb A...

STAFFJune 6, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
Life, Unbounded

The Venus Movies

As a final hurrah for the 2012 Venus transit of the Sun, here are some beautiful time-lapse movies from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory; an orbiting telescope that can image the Sun in a variety of narrow wavebands, from visible light to ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet, probing the different temperature structures at the solar surface.First up, the ingress of Venus in the 30.4 nanometer waveband - viewing the solar chromosphere and transition region at temperatures of around 50,000 Kelvin: Next, the full transit in the 17.1 nanometer band - viewing the 'quiet' corona and upper transition region at temperatures of around 630,000 Kelvin: Here we have ingress again, in the 19.3 nanometer band, probing the corona and hot flare structure at about 1.2 to 20 million Kelvin: And finally, the last view of Venus in transit for more than the next 100 years, egress at 17.1 nanometers, probing the 630,000 Kelvin temperature structures:...

June 6, 2012 — Caleb A. Scharf

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