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Soot May Help Shift Tropics North

Soot May Help Shift Tropics North

Soot may be responsible for the tropics expanding north, according to an analysis involving multiple computer models of the climate. By absorbing sunlight and trapping extra heat in the atmosphere, the tiny, black particles may be helping the poleward march of tropical conditions.The research will be published in Nature on May 17.

May 16, 2012 — David Biello
Under construction - ITER in LEGO

Under construction - ITER in LEGO

If you just received your new issue of Scientific American , you saw the article The Problems with ITER and the Fading Dream of Fusion Energy by Geoff Brumfiel.

May 16, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
#SciAmBlogs Tuesday - on that TIME cover..., stem cells, invasive beetles, drowned Cretaceous birds, onset of autism, and more.

#SciAmBlogs Tuesday - on that TIME cover..., stem cells, invasive beetles, drowned Cretaceous birds, onset of autism, and more.

- Eric Michael Johnson - Out of the Mouth of Babes  - Samer Fakhri - Empowering the Body to Fix Its Parts  - Miller Zou - USC Dornsife Scientific Diving: The Invasion of the Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle  - Darren Naish - A drowned nesting colony of Late Cretaceous birds  - Dana Hunter - When You’re Doing Geology, You’ve Got To Break a Few Rocks  - Judy Stone - TEDMED: Tougher topics to chew on  - Erin Podolak - The SA Incubator: Helping Hatch Science Writers Since July 2011  - Bora Zivkovic - The SA Incubator, or, why promote young science writers?  - Scicurious - ADHD: behavioral and cognitive therapies  - DNLee - Diversity in Science: Celebrating the people who do science  - Brendan Borrell - The Most Exciting Moment of My Scientific Career  - Mariette DiChristina - Searching for the Onset of Autism  - Michael Moyer - The Mathematician’s Obesity Fallacy =======================Conversations on our articles and blog posts often continue on our Facebook page - "Like" it and join in the discussion.

STAFFMay 16, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
The Most Exciting Moment of My Scientific Career

The Most Exciting Moment of My Scientific Career

Thumbi Ndung'u left Kenya 1995 to study medicine at Harvard. He later returned to Africa on a mission to exploit HIV's vulnerabilities. Now the head of the HIV Pathogenesis Program at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, Ndung'u spoke with Scientific American contributor Brendan Borrell about a research breakthrough early in his career that helped set the pace for the Kenyan's ongoing study of genes in the immune system that may help to fight AIDS and lead to a vaccine.

May 15, 2012 — Brendan Borrell
Living Photography

Living Photography

Image of the Week #42, May 14th, 2012:
From: Living Photography by Christina Agapakis at Oscillator .

May 14, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic
What Are Science's Ugliest Experiments?

What Are Science's Ugliest Experiments?

When I teach history of science at Stevens Institute of Technology, I devote plenty of time to science's glories, the kinds of achievements that my buddy George Johnson wrote about in The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments (Alfred A.

May 14, 2012 — John Horgan

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Complex Causes. Alternative Solutions.