Skip to main content

Blogs

Recent Posts

Select Topic

Robot dragonfly takes flight

Researchers at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands today unveiled a small, remote-controlled aircraft weighing just 0.11 ounces (three grams) and with a four-inch (10-centimeter) wingspan--just large enough to accommodate an onboard camera...

July 23, 2008 — Larry Greenemeier

NASA plans GPS-like system for return to the moon

NASA has coughed up $1.2 million for a navigation system that will help astronauts find their way around the lunar surface when they return in 2020. The Lunar Astronaut Spatial Orientation and Information System (LASOIS) is designed to function  much the same way as a global positioning system (GPS)...

July 22, 2008 — Larry Greenemeier

Meet Makemake, the fourth dwarf planet

Astronomers have upgraded a distant rock discovered in 2005 to the category of dwarf planet, the controversial designation created two years ago by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) to deal with planetlike bodies far out in the solar system...

July 21, 2008 — JR Minkel

Journalists + Facebook = Scoops

Should journalists be hanging out on Facebook? I only joined about two months ago, after some prodding from other reporter friends. My answer, though, is an emphatic yes, because I got a story within about 20 minutes of signing up...

July 21, 2008 — Ivan Oransky

NIH official nixes large HIV vaccine trial

The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) this week canceled plans for a large clinical trial of an experimental vaccine to combat the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

July 18, 2008 — Nikhil Swaminathan

Hackers convene Last HOPE conference in the Big Apple

  Computer programmers, researchers and students descended on New York City's Hotel Pennsylvania today for the HOPE conference, a forum for all things related to security, including a healthy dose of sessions devoted to breaking security...

July 18, 2008 — Larry Greenemeier

A constellation of problems for shuttle's replacement

Problems are mounting for the Orion spacecraft that is supposed to replace the retiring space shuttle fleet and carry U.S. astronauts to the moon by 2020. Among the most severe, according to a 117-page internal NASA report posted on Nasawatch.com this week: an $80-million overrun on development of a single motor; a hard-to-open hatch door; and the potential that the stack (craft and Ares 1 rocket) will vibrate itself to pieces during takeoff...

July 18, 2008 — JR Minkel

Blog Index

Scroll To Top

End of Summer Sale

End of Summer Sale