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A cure for the common cold? Culprit genome sequenced, but ...

Could the common cold become a thing of the past? Scientists have unraveled the genetic code for all 99 strains of the rhinovirus, but there may be a disconnect between excitement over the feat in the lab versus at pharmaceutical companies that would ordinarily develop a cure or vaccine against infection...

February 13, 2009 — Jordan Lite

Twitter: What is it good for?

Just who's using Twitter, and to what end? We're about to tell you, but the answer takes more than 140 characters — the limit for tweets.

Some 11 percent of U.S.

February 13, 2009 — Jordan Lite

Big win for a tiny endangered species, the American pika

The rabbit-like American pika ( Ochotona princeps ) got lucky this week. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, responding to a lawsuit filed by the Center for Biological Diversity and Earthjustice, has agreed to assess whether the increasingly rare animal qualifies for protection under the Endangered Species Act...

February 13, 2009 — John Platt

Let's get it on--The condom, that is

Wondering if your sweetheart is going to buy you a box of condoms instead of a box of chocolates for Valentine's Day? Maybe your lover's celebrating two holidays at once: February is also National Condom Month...

February 13, 2009 — Jordan Lite

Satellite collision debris could persist for years

Officials say that the crash this week between a U.S. commercial communications satellite and a defunct Russian satellite generated possibly thousands of pieces of debris that will hang around in low-Earth orbit for years...

February 13, 2009 — John Matson

Steven Chu calls for alt-energy "revolution"

The world needs a "revolution" in science and technology to solve global warming, says Energy Secretary Steven Chu.

Chu, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, made the remarks in today's New York Times ...

February 12, 2009 — Jordan Lite

"Digital hand" researchers score second round of NSF funding

A team of researchers developing "digital hand" technology (described in an article last year by Scientific American.com ) designed to help people with carpal tunnel syndrome and other disorders use computers has received nearly $473,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to build a commercial prototype device...

February 12, 2009 — Larry Greenemeier

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