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Could coffee be the alternative fuel of the future?

Could coffee be the alternative fuel of the future?

Researchers from the University of Nevada, Reno, have discovered that coffee can be turned into an alternative fuel other than caffeine: biodiesel. And you can have your coffee and drink it too.

December 10, 2008 — David Biello
Diabetes Rx ups bone fracture risk

Diabetes Rx ups bone fracture risk

A new study indicates that drugs called thiazolidinediones used to control blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes may do more harm than good. Scientists report in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) that women who take the meds have reduced spine and hip bone density and have double the risk of fracturing bones if they're on the pills for more than a year.

December 10, 2008 — Coco Ballantyne
Death on Mount Everest: The perils of the descent

Death on Mount Everest: The perils of the descent

As difficult as it is to scale Mount Everest, coming back down from the world’s tallest peak is far more deadly, a new study shows.

Some 192 of the 212 deaths on the Himalayan mountain that occurred between 1921 and 2006 were above base camp, according to research in this week’s online edition of the British Medical Journal .

December 10, 2008 — Jordan Lite
The biggest loser: Buying weight loss

The biggest loser: Buying weight loss

Seems money trumps health when it comes to losing weight. A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association today found that people were more likely to stick to weight-loss programs if they were offered cash incentives.

December 10, 2008 — Coco Ballantyne
At last, people moving!

At last, people moving!

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the tenth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA-- Just 24 hours ago, all the teams were pinned down on Antarctic coasts by weather, equipment and bureaucracy.

December 10, 2008 — Robin Bell
The computer mouse at 40: Remembering history in the making

The computer mouse at 40: Remembering history in the making

Forty years ago, Douglas Engelbart gave a 90-minute presentation on a "computer-based, interactive, multiconsole display system" under development at Stanford Research Institute (SRI), according to an official announcement of the event.

December 10, 2008 — Larry Greenemeier
Carbon dioxide detected in a land far, far away

Carbon dioxide detected in a land far, far away

A poorly kept secret is now official: the Hubble Space Telescope has discovered carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system.

December 10, 2008 — John Matson
Audacious Plans, Nasty Weather

Audacious Plans, Nasty Weather

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the ninth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles."   McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--Sometimes I wonder why we were so audacious to plan a project that required decent spring weather in several places around the entire Antarctic continent.  Our weather delays are accumulating.  The first delay was when the British plane was pinned down by storms, first in Patagonia and then at Rothera on the Antarctic Peninsula.

December 9, 2008 — Robin Bell

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