Skip to main content

Blogs

Recent Posts

Select Topic

Human Design

Keeping up with the news of synthetic biology means I often see a lot of kooky things. There's the delightfully kooky iGEM project ideas or news of cyborg yeast (more on that hopefully sometime soon), a few conspiracy theory websites, and lots of newspaper articles with headlines like (I'm paraphrasing here) "Synthetic Biology Will Soon Kill Us All" or "Every Problem in the Entire World to be Solved by Synthetic Biology in the Next Decade." This oscillation between certain death and techno-utopia is what Drew Endy calls "The Half-pipe of Doom," the inescapable binary of equally implausible hype surrounding the field...

November 15, 2011 — Christina Agapakis

JAMA gets a facelift

For almost 20 years, a neatly boxed image of fine art has graced the covers of the Journal of the American Medical Association, highlighting an emphasis they put on their commitment to art a half century ago...

November 15, 2011 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Another Rhino Goes Extinct and Other Updates from the Brink

Just two weeks after the World Wildlife Fund declared the Vietnam Javan rhinoceros ( Rhinoceros sondaicus annamiticus ) extinct comes the announcement of another rhino extinction, this time the western black rhino ( Diceros bicornis longipes ) of Africa.The declaration came last week from the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) as part of the latest update to its Red List of Threatened Species, which tracks the conservation status of endangered animals and plants around the world.The loss of the western black rhino was, sadly, expected...

November 15, 2011 — John R. Platt

We've Got Trouble! All in Agreement Say Uh Oh

If you turn on the news, you're likely to be inundated with depressing pictures: Oceans are rising, species are dying, pollution is spreading. But how bad do most scientists think it really is?...

November 15, 2011 — Rose Eveleth

The Internet Can Show You A Lot, But Not This

I never noticed how hard it was to get around with wheels until I had a stroller to push. Stairs and curbs are everywhere, and taking the most direct route is never an option - retrofitted buildings either tuck handicapped entrances around the sides of buildings or require you to zig and zag before you approach the entrance you would otherwise have waltzed up to...

November 15, 2011 — Kalliopi Monoyios

Lessons from Sherlock Holmes: Don’t Try to Make Bricks without Clay

If this week’s lesson sounds a bit repetitive, it is meant to, not only because it touches on so many of the poor thought habits that Holmes singles out in his attempts to craft Watson into an abler logician, but also because it is the last–for now, at least–of the "Lessons from Sherlock Holmes" series, [...]..

November 15, 2011 — Maria Konnikova

Lessons from Sherlock Holmes: Don't Try to Make Bricks without Clay

If this week's lesson sounds a bit repetitive, it is meant to, not only because it touches on so many of the poor thought habits that Holmes singles out in his attempts to craft Watson into an abler logician, but also because it is the last--for now, at least--of the “Lessons from Sherlock Holmes” series, and as such, is aimed at capturing one of our most common (and most commonly ignored) errors of thought: that of skipping over the details and jumping straight into the conclusions.Not to worry...

November 15, 2011 — Maria Konnikova

Blog Index

Scroll To Top

Scientific American Unlimited

Scientific American Unlimited