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3-D Printed Octopus Suckers Help Robots Stick

Legions of animal-inspired robots are being created to improve military missions and disaster response efforts—from crawling cockroach-like RHex bots to leaping Sand Flea robots and the speeding Cheetah machines...

February 21, 2013 — Katherine Harmon

Introducing: Nicholas St. Fleur

This is a series of Q&As with new, young and up-and-coming science, health and environmental writers and reporters. They - at least some of them - have recently hatched in the Incubators (science writing programs at schools of journalism), have even more recently fledged (graduated), and are now making their mark as wonderful new voices explaining science to the public...

STAFFFebruary 21, 2013 — Bora Zivkovic

Stormwater Film Festival

On January 30, Plugged In’s unquenchable interest in infrastructure expressed itself in an actual tour of an infrastructure system itself. As part of ScienceOnline2013, the fabulous science/scientist/communications convention/festival/love-in held every year in my own city of Raleigh, I led a tour of the stormwater tunnels beneath the city of Raleigh.I know all about these tunnels because I splashed around in them while trying to figure out what happened to my stormwater when I was reporting my infrastructure book, On the Grid.Anyhow...

February 21, 2013 — Scott Huler

New Guidelines on Testing Kids DNA-the Cliff s Notes Version

Exomes are big news. Sequencing of the protein-encoding part of the genome is increasingly solving medical mysteries in children. It began with Nicholas Volker and his recovery from a devastating gastrointestinal disease with a stem cell transplant once his exome sequence revealed his problem.And my recent Medscape assignments reveal the trend: 7 of 12 kids’ exomes leading to diagnosis at Duke University (from May 10, 2012); whole genomes of 5 infants from the neonatal intensive care unit at Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics in Kansas City, Missouri (from October 3), in just 50 hours each, focusing on 600 single-gene diseases; and 300 patients at the Whole Genome Laboratory at the Baylor College of Medicine, with 300 more waiting -- 85% of them kids (from November 9, 2012).But wait.Before we all run out to get our exomes and/or genomes sequenced, it might be a good idea to slow down and look at how to handle existing, single-gene tests – especially in children...

February 21, 2013 — Ricki Lewis

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