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Zap the West No l Virus to Save Santa!

Zap the West No l Virus to Save Santa!

What happens when a studio, specializing in medical illustration, animation and interactive apps, sets out to make a Christmas card? You get The Santastic Voyage, a video game where you shrink down, zip through Saint Nick's bloodstream, zapping the West Noël Virus and Bah Humbugs in order to save Christmas.

December 19, 2012 — Glendon Mellow
Please Play with Your Math: New Museum Opens in New York City

Please Play with Your Math: New Museum Opens in New York City

Math can be a beautiful, immersive, full-body experience, according to the creators of the newly opened Museum of Math, or MoMath, in New York City. A sculpture that lights up and plays music, a touch-screen floor that turns into a maze and a square-wheeled tricycle that one can ride around a bumpy track are just a few of the more than 30 exhibits in the 19,000-square-foot space.

December 19, 2012 — Marissa Fessenden
Guest Post: Can we store electricity to transform the grid?

Guest Post: Can we store electricity to transform the grid?

Over the next several weeks, we’ll be joined by Robert Fares, a graduate student at The University of Texas at Austin researching the benefits of grid energy storage as part of Pecan Street Inc.’s ongoing smart grid demonstration project.

December 19, 2012 — David Wogan
The Most Fascinating Human Evolution Discoveries of 2012

The Most Fascinating Human Evolution Discoveries of 2012

PALEO DIET: Analyses of tartar on the teeth of Australopithecus sediba show that this early human species ate bark and other unexpected foods. Image: Kate Wong Recent years have brought considerable riches for those of us interested in human evolution and 2012 proved no exception.

December 19, 2012 — Kate Wong
Link love: December 2012

Link love: December 2012

Some interesting, insightful, or amusing things I've been reading this week. The DSM-V is out I'm not a psychologist, but the DSM, or Diagnostic Systems Manual, is still important to my research, but as someone who teaches evolutionary medicine, most especially my teaching.

December 19, 2012 — Kate Clancy
We Have an Obesity Problem in This Country.

We Have an Obesity Problem in This Country.

According to a recent report, “F as in Fat” by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, “The number of obese adults…are on course to increase dramatically in every state in the country over the next 20 years.” According to their analysis of government data, “If obesity rates continue on their current trajectories, by 2030, 13 states could have adult obesity rates above 60 percent, 39 states could have rates above 50 percent, and all 50 states could have rates above 44 percent.”This sobering news has doctors, health care providers and politicians asking the same questions: how do we prevent this scenario from happening, and how do we help people take control of their health?America has a long history of solving complex problems.

December 19, 2012 — Richard H. Adamson
#SciAmBlogs Tuesday - Maya Apocalypse, next Mars rover, microgrids, trans-planetary microbes, dopamine and depression, and more.

#SciAmBlogs Tuesday - Maya Apocalypse, next Mars rover, microgrids, trans-planetary microbes, dopamine and depression, and more.

And we have a brand new Image of the Week. - Andy Rivkin - The fight to save planetary science, and why the new Mars rover doesn’t mean victory  - Caroline Dodds Pennock - The 2012 Apocalypse, or why the world won’t end this week  - Judy Stone - A Clinical Trial and Suicide Leave Many Questions: Part 3: Conflict of Interest  - Scicurious - The dopamine side(s) of depression, part 2  - Dawn Santoianni - Guest Post: Are Microgrids the Key to Energy Security?  - Caleb A.

STAFFDecember 18, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic

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