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Guest Post: How to Foil Mental Health Stigma

Guest Post: How to Foil Mental Health Stigma

In lieu of this month's events in Connecticut and beyond, it's my privilege to lend my platform to another voice, one who runs alongside the mission of this blog, and one of the smartest scientists and bravest people I know.

December 27, 2012 — Cassie Rodenberg
The Eagle Ford Shale Boom from Space

The Eagle Ford Shale Boom from Space

It can be difficult to comprehend just how big the current U.S. shale boom is. Here in Central Texas, we hear about the Eagle Ford Shale and how it’s transforming South Texas (in both positive and negative ways).The shale, named for the town of Eagle Ford, TX, is a geologic remnant of the ancient ocean that covered present day Texas millions of years ago, when the remains of sea life (especially ancient plankton) died and deposited onto the seafloor, were buried by several hundred feet of sediment, eventually turning into the rich source of hydrocarbons we have today.The shale was first tapped in 2008 and now has around 20 active fields good producing over 900 million cubic feet per day of natural gas.

December 27, 2012 — David Wogan
This Year s Best Tips For Young And Early-Career Science Writers

This Year s Best Tips For Young And Early-Career Science Writers

Democracy in action! Here are the blog posts from the “Tips” series which have received the most traffic in 2012. Tips is a series on The SA Incubator which aims to provide young and early-career science writers with, well, tips to aid them in their budding careers.

STAFFDecember 27, 2012 — Khalil A. Cassimally
Climate Model Coverage: Far from Model Journalism

Climate Model Coverage: Far from Model Journalism

November 2012 temperatures relative to average across the globe With a less-than-stellar end to the Qatar climate talks, and with all eyes on the US for more ambitious commitments ahead of the next round, it is more important than ever for the American public to be better educated on the dire implications of a rapidly warming world.Despite a recent shift toward greater belief in anthropogenic climate change, perception of its risks remains low among the US public.A study published in the September issue of Nature Climate Change may help explain why.

December 27, 2012 — Karthika Muthukumaraswamy
Tsunami in the Geological Record

Tsunami in the Geological Record

The tsunami of Indonesia 2004 and Japan 2011 showed that they are a common element associated with earthquakes. Modern databases list more than 2.000 tsunami events worldwide in the last 4.000 years, most of them recorded in historic documents, chronicles and even myths - and yet tsunami deposits in the geological record seem to be relatively rare.In theory a tsunami can trigger a variety of erosion and depositional processes, like uprush and backwash currents, turbidity currents, debris flows and landslides, therefore also the formed sediments can vary from fine-grained sediments to large boulders.- When the tsunami hits the coast it will first erode older sediments.

December 26, 2012 — David Bressan

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