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Toxic Little Molecules

Toxic Little Molecules

There are various different ways that pathogenic bacteria can damage and kill human cells, but one of the most common is by the production of toxic molecules.

January 13, 2013 — S.E. Gould
Why the NYTimes "Green Blog" Is Now Essential

Why the NYTimes "Green Blog" Is Now Essential

A few days ago we woke up to the news that the New York Times is eliminating their environment desk. Predictably, the immediate reaction of many was "oh, noooo!".

January 13, 2013 — Bora Zivkovic
The Future of Computers

The Future of Computers

With much progress being made in nanotechnology, the future of computers has two directions: nanotechnology and cells. Nanotechnology is the engineering of a system at the molecular scale.

January 13, 2013 — Ashley Tucker
M@h*(pOet)?ica Circles, Part 3

M@h*(pOet)?ica Circles, Part 3

Editor's note (11/7/13): Find the entry point and new posts of Bob Grumman's M@h*(pOet)?ica at http://poeticks.com/ #StorySaturday is a Guest Blog weekend experiment in which we invite people to write about science in a different, unusual format – fiction, science fiction, lablit, personal story, fable, fairy tale, poetry, or comic strip.

January 12, 2013 — Bob Grumman
Archaea Are More Wonderful Than You Know

Archaea Are More Wonderful Than You Know

Thermococcus gammatolerans -- a flagellate archaeon that thrives in hot, oxygen-starved waters. Note the tuft of flagella. This microbe lives in water hotter than about 160F.

January 12, 2013 — Jennifer Frazer
Knotty Fun at the Joint Math Meetings

Knotty Fun at the Joint Math Meetings

Mathematicians attempting to untangle a human knot at a knot "flash mob" on January 11, 2013 at the Joint Mathematics Meetings. Image: American Mathematical Society Anyone with necklaces or lace-up shoes has some first-hand experience with knots, but believe it or not (knot?), there is an entire mathematical discipline dedicated to studying knots and some closely related concepts.

January 12, 2013 — Evelyn Lamb
Friday Weird Science: Strap on your heels

Friday Weird Science: Strap on your heels

What makes high heels so hot hot hot? The authors of this paper say it's biomechanics and evolution, baby. But is it really? Let's all strap on our stilettos and check out the paper "High heels as supernormal stimuli: How wearing high heels affects judgements offemale attractiveness" at Neurotic Physiology.

January 11, 2013 — Scicurious
The Royal Institute's Christmas Lectures Online Now

The Royal Institute's Christmas Lectures Online Now

I've never had the pleasure of being in the UK at the time that the Royal Institute of Great Britain have aired their very famous Christmas Lectures, but I hear often from followers and friends in the UK on social media how many of them have been positively impacted by these lectures.The history of the RI Christmas Lectures is quite long and rich.

January 11, 2013 — Joanne Manaster

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