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Posts Tagged "Diversity"

Guest Blog

Under-represented and underserved: Why minority role models matter in STEM

A recent University of Massachusetts Amherst study found having academic contact with female professionals in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) can have positive influences on students—female students in particular. For girls and young women studying these subjects in school, being able to identify female role models helps them imagine themselves as STEM professionals. The [...]

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Image of the Week

Team SciTweeps in Lego-Form

SylivaEarle-lego

Credit: Maia Weinstock Source: Oceanographer Sylvia Earle is a Glamour Woman of the Year by Maia Weinstock on Voices In her post about oceanographer Sylvia Earle getting recognized this month by Glamour magazine for her contributions to science and society, Maia Weinstock included this picture of a custom Lego figurine of Dr. Earle scuba diving. [...]

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Observations

Ada Lovelace and Gender Diversity in Science

Ada Lovelace, widely regarded as the first computer programmer, would probably have appreciated the current thinking on diversity in the workplace. Studies suggest that  for tasks that involve creativity and innovation, on top of our game when we’re working with people who challenge us to leave our comfort zones (a theme we explored in a [...]

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Voices

Media Portrayals of Female Scientists Often Shallow, Superficial

Neuroscientist Susan Greenfield speaking at an event in Wales in 2013. (Nationa Assembly for Wales/Flickr)

When British neuroscientist Susan Greenfield became the first woman to give the UK’s prestigious Royal Institution Christmas lectures in 1994, journalists at the time focused on her path-breaking achievement. But they also reported on something else: how she looked. The Times of London wrote that in the televised lectures she wore “a blush pink silk [...]

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Voices

It’s Time for More Racial Diversity in STEM Toys

The hugely popular Doc McStuffins is proving that consumers are ready for more STEM characters of color. (Photo: Disney)

It’s clear that we as a nation are failing to engage minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics as well as we could. In a recent op-ed for The New York Times, columnist Charles Blow reminded us with sobering statistics that people of color remain vastly underrepresented in the STEM disciplines. He noted, for [...]

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Voices

Inspiring Young Men from Minority Backgrounds to Code

“We knew there was so much talent out there who would be eager to code, and just didn’t know the field existed. It is very rewarding to see how their lives can change for the better,” says Lewis Halpern. (Image courtesy of All Star Code)

On a sign that adorns the premises of the vibrant New York technology charity, All Star Code, the bold messaging could not be clearer.  Displayed in large writing are the top ten principles that inspired the charity’s creation. Most prominently placed, and one that will ring true to many Americans, is number one. It reads: [...]

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Voices

Gone in 2014: Remembering 10 Notable Women in Science

Looking back on the year that was, science mavens may notice that tributes to those who’ve passed on in the preceding 12 months are far more often filled with stars of stage, screen, politics and sport than with the pioneering women and men who have bettered our society through discovery and invention. This is especially [...]

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Voices

“You Are Welcome Here”: Small Stickers Make a Big Difference for LGBTQ Scientists

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's "You Are Welcome Here" sticker.

When I visited the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod in early 2013 for an open house for prospective students, in many senses I was feeling under the weather. I stepped off my flight from California into a “wintry mix” and my inappropriate Bay Area shoes soaked up a puddle of water and then [...]

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Voices

Beyond “The Pipeline”: Reframing Science’s Diversity Challenge

Pipeline. (James T M Towill/Geograph)

One of the most commonly used metaphors for describing the solution for growing and diversifying America’s scientific talent pool is the “STEM pipeline.” Major policy reports have called on the U.S. to enlarge it so it does not fall behind other nations.  Scholars and the popular press have highlighted the need to fix pipeline “leaks” [...]

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Voices

When Being Borinqueña Acquired New Meaning

borinquena-1eraniversario

I knew my idea was not unique, mainly because it originated from a collective need. Like many others, I felt the need to have a voice and to form a space for a community that would highlight and represent the women in science of Puerto Rico. This was my personal desire and aspiration, but one I [...]

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Voices

Ada Lovelace and Gender Diversity in Science

Ada Lovelace, widely regarded as the first computer programmer, would probably have appreciated the current thinking on diversity in the workplace. Studies suggest that for tasks that involve creativity and innovation, on top of our game when we’re working with people who challenge us to leave our comfort zones (a theme we explored in a [...]

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Voices

Culture Dish: Promoting Diversity in Science Writing

Image courtesy of Klari Reis - www.klariart.com

The most persistent — and infuriating — question about diversity in science writing has to be: “Why do we need diversity?” Sometimes that question is followed by this: “Isn’t science color-blind?” To answer that second question first — no, science is most definitely not color-blind, any more than history or politics or literature is color-blind. [...]

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Voices

Middle Schoolers Develop App to Help Visually Impaired

From left to right: Cassandra Baquero, Andres Salas, Janessa Leija and Caitlin Gonzales in front of the White House.

“We saw him struggling, trying to get around. What if we could create an app to help him?” Like many great ideas, Hello Navi started with a question. The app—invented by Cassandra Baquero, Grecia Cano, Caitlyn Gonzalez, Kayleen Gonzalez, Janessa Leija and Jacqueline Garcia Torres—helps visually challenged students navigate their school grounds. Hello Navi was [...]

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