ADVERTISEMENT
Voices

Voices

Exploring and celebrating diversity in science.

  • MacGyvering a Female Engineer onto Television

    MacGyvering a Female Engineer onto Television

    By Jayde Lovell | August 26, 2015 |

    In late July, I had the honor of being selected as one of five winners of The Next MacGyver competition, an initiative designed to encourage more women to choose a career in engineering. In the United States, less than one in five engineering graduates are female, a worrying statistic that’s been attributed to “ very little understanding of what engineering is ” amongst the general public. […]

    Keep reading »

  • The Quest for a Female MacGyver

    The Quest for a Female MacGyver

    By Lee Zlotoff | August 26, 2015 |

    At a town hall meeting in Los Angeles last year, President Obama said: “When you see an engineer or a tech person on a TV show or movies, something like 90 percent of them are male. So if you never see you in that position, it ’s hard to imagine, well, that ’s something I should be doing . […]

    Keep reading »

  • Bring Science to Life to Boost Students' Interest in STEM

    Bring Science to Life to Boost Students' Interest in STEM

    By David C. Thompson and Sabriya Stukes | June 30, 2015 |

    Have you been listening to the StartUp podcast ? If you haven’t, you should. The first episode of season one, which aired in September of 2014, begins with Alex Blumberg (formerly of NPR’s This American Life ) pitching to Silicon Valley entrepreneur and investor Chris Sacca. […]

    Keep reading »

  • LEGO Adds More Women in Science to Its Lineup

    LEGO Adds More Women in Science to Its Lineup

    By Maia Weinstock | June 24, 2015 |

    It's been nearly two years since LEGO released its first female lab scientist minifigure , Professor C. Bodin, in the late summer of 2013. The Scientist wasn't the first LEGO minifig in a STEM profession, but her release brought new-found awareness of persistent gender stereotypes and biases in the children's toy market. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Furor over Tim Hunt Must Lead to Systemic Change

    Furor over Tim Hunt Must Lead to Systemic Change

    By Connie St Louis | June 15, 2015 |

    The World Conference of Science Journalism in South Korea has ended and I get on the long flight home from Seoul to London. During the flight I have a very disturbing dream. It begins with me steering my wheeled luggage through the Nothing to Declare lane at Heathrow airport. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Why Tim Hunt's Sexist Comments Were No

    Why Tim Hunt's Sexist Comments Were No "Joke"

    By Cristine Russell | June 15, 2015 |

    As a participant at the World Conference of Science Journalists last week in Seoul, I had a ringside seat for the running story of Nobel Prize-winner Sir Tim Hunt’s dismissive and offensive offhand remarks about female scientists. Reducing them to romantic distractions in the workplace that wilt in the face of criticism, he stunned an international audience by even calling for “single-sex labs.” A social media uproar soon followed, and the 72-year-old British scientist was asked to resign from positions at University College London and the Royal Society. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Empowering Native Alaskans to Become Stewards of Their Land

    Empowering Native Alaskans to Become Stewards of Their Land

    By Dr. Herb Schroeder and Beth Spangler | April 20, 2015 |

    ANSEP Summer Bridge student Randall Friendly sits in the passenger seat as the pilot prepares for landing on Karluk Lake on Kodiak Island. The 408 residents of Tuntutuliak Alaska, live at the mouth of the Kuskokwim River, 450 miles west of Anchorage over a mountain range and across a seemingly endless and treeless rolling tundra plain. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Media Portrayals of of Female Scientists Often Shallow, Superficial

    Media Portrayals of of Female Scientists Often Shallow, Superficial

    By Declan Fahy | March 16, 2015 |

    Neuroscientist Susan Greenfield speaking at an event in Wales in 2013. (Nationa Assembly for Wales/Flickr) When British neuroscientist Susan Greenfield became the first woman to give the UK’s prestigious Royal Institution Christmas lectures in 1994, journalists at the time focused on her path-breaking achievement. […]

    Keep reading »

  • It's Time for More Racial Diversity in STEM Toys

    It's Time for More Racial Diversity in STEM Toys

    By Maia Weinstock | February 23, 2015 |

    Custom minifigures by the author, made from LEGO and off-brand parts, depict (clockwise from top left): nuclear physicist and educator Shirley Ann Jackson; chemical engineer Paula Hammond; STEM popularizer Neil deGrasse Tyson; biologist and blogger DNLee; STEM educator, entrepreneur, and former astronaut Mae Jemison; chemical engineer Sangeeta Bhatia; astrophysicist Jedidah Isler; and mechanical engineer David Sengeh. […]

    Keep reading »

  • Why There Is No Perfect Human In Puerto Rico or Anywhere Else

    Why There Is No Perfect Human In Puerto Rico or Anywhere Else

    By Taras K. Oleksyk and Juan Carlos Martinez-Cruzado | February 5, 2015 |

    Disappointed by James Watson’s decision to sell his Nobel Prize medal, Lior Pachter , a computational biologist who works on genomics at the University of California Berkeley, wrote an entry on his private blog in early December protesting the decision. […]

    Keep reading »


Show More

Back to School Sale!

One year just $19.99

Order now >

X

Email this Article

X