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Posts Tagged "#BlackandSTEM"

Roots of Unity

Mathematics, Live: A Conversation with Evelyn Boyd Granville

Evelyn Boyd Granville in 1997. Image: Margaret Murray, via Mathematicians of the African Diaspora by Scott W. Williams.

Evelyn Boyd Granville was one of the first African American women to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics. She recently turned 90, and I wrote a post here to celebrate. This more complete version of our interview originally appeared in the September-October 2014 issue of the Association for Women in Mathematics Newsletter. It is an edited transcript that [...]

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Roots of Unity

Happy Birthday, Evelyn Boyd Granville!

Evelyn Boyd Granville in 1997. Image: Margaret Murray, via Mathematicians of the African Diaspora by Scott W. Williams.

Evelyn Boyd Granville, the second African American woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics, turns 90 today (May 1, 2014). I first heard her name in a talk by Patricia Kenschaft about African American mathematicians. Of course, having an affinity for the name Evelyn, she stuck in my mind, and when I found out her [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Earth Day 2015: 7 #BLACKandSTEM Environmental Scientists you should follow today

CaT B

1. Dr. Dawn Wright Dr. Wright is Chief Scientist of the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) and a professor of Geography and Oceanography at Oregon State University. Her research interests in seafloor mapping and tectonics, ocean conservation, and environmental informatics contributes to the overall understanding of climate, ocean science and environmental conservation issues of our day. [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Irene Mathieu and Maladi Kache Pa Gen Remed

Sci blogger spotlight IM

Welcome to the twenty-seventh installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. I love how this series not only introduces readers to blogs and communicators they have overlooked in this big world wide web, but it also introduces me to [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Dr. Melanie Harrison Okoro

spotlight MHO

Welcome to the twenty-fifth installment of You Should Know. This week I am kicking off Women’s History Month and celebrating Dynamic Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics. Introducing…. Dr. Melanie Harrison Okoro Dr. Okoro uses social media like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter to inform and engage readers on topics in environmental science – focusing [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Dr. EE Just, Forgotten Father of Epigenetics

Just-postage-stamp

Welcome to the twenty-fourth installment of You Should Know. Today I am shining a Black History Month spotlight on #BLACKandSTEM historical figure and scientific leader, Dr. Ernest Everett Just. Dr. EE Just was a cellular biologist who completed his doctoral studies with Professor Frank Lillie at the University of Chicago in 1916. While completing his [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Michelle Hunter and Exploring Neuroscience Through Art

Sci blogger spotlight Michelle Hunter

Welcome to the twenty-third installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and the Blogs you may not yet know about. Introducing…Michelle Hunter and Exploring Neuroscience Through Art Michelle Hunter is an artist that loves science. Her paintings and drawings focus on how different areas of our brain [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Dr J Marshall Shepherd, host of the The WxGeeks Show

Sci blogger spotlight JMS

Welcome to the twenty-second installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and the Blogs you may not yet know about. Introducing…Dr. J. Marshall Shepherd and The WxGeeks Show Wx is shorthand Weather and The WxGeeks is a new nationally televised talk show focused on STEM (science, technology, [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Nadia Myrthil and A Lady in Neurophilosophy

Sci blogger spotlight.jpg Nadia Myrth

It’s the 20th installment of this series, and the first one of the new year. Happy 2015! You Should Know introduces you to scientists (and engineers), science blogs and now science communicators that offer value information via social media to wider and broader audiences. Introducing…Nadia Myrthil and A Lady in Neurophilosophy Lady in Neurophilosophy is a new [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Time To Teach: Supporting Technology for Science Education in Special Education Classrooms

Tucker students 2

As regular readers of this blog are aware, I am deep proponent of science outreach to the under-served. However, I acknowledge one of the areas that I am weak and that’s in my science outreach to individuals with special education needs. I have attended teaching workshops designed to assist educators in revamping courses for students [...]

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The Urban Scientist

#ReclaimMLK: The Revolutionary and Geek – my thoughts on rejecting sanitized images of Dr. King

I was a tour guide of Black History and Civil Rights History in Memphis from 1994-1999. I've been in this museum close to 100 times, maybe more and guided groups through it's halls.

The United States national holiday that commemorates the birth of human and civil rights leader Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is always a somber occasion for me. I acknowledge that I am all into my feelings today, because of today, because of the current climate of social injustice our nation is witnessing again. I’m [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Undergraduate Research Highlights from #SICB2015

abstractheadergraphic2015

Happy New Year! I hope you all had a restorative holiday break. I spent nearly two weeks with family and friends and it was glorious. I capped off the break attending the annual meeting Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. I attended talks and networked.   The highlight of the meeting was meeting undergraduate researchers [...]

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