ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "academia"

Context and Variation

Stag Parties: Awareness and Elegant Solutions

Kiddo spills her milk. We lock eyes, and she dissolves in a puddle of sadness, crying about how it’s all her fault and she feels SO BAD. “Kiddo, honey, it’s really okay. Let’s get a towel and wipe it up together.” But she can’t stop crying. I comfort her for a while, being patient with [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Students Blog Evolutionary Medicine

Just wanted to draw your attention to this year’s student-run class blog for my Evolutionary Medicine class here at the University of Illinois. I am using the same assignment and rubric as last year, which is modified version of Mark Sample’s blog assignment at Profhacker (I wrote about this last year here). Check it out [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

AAAS Happenings: Ladyparts and Roller Derby Shenanigans

I’m attending the AAAS Meetings in Chicago this year in both my capacities as a scientist: as someone who does reproductive physiology research and as a science communicator. And it all happens tomorrow! Check out the press briefing today for the Building Babies session. Katie Hinde is the symposium organizer, and fellow session speakers are [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Toxic or Just Tough?

I’m working against too many deadlines as usual and am unable to write a long blog post. But I was pretty troubled by this piece in The Nation the other day… troubled because the hard work and brilliant insights of black women I respected were being turned into something far more sinister. Suddenly white women [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Welcome or Not Welcome: Off the Air Thoughts

I was asked to be a guest on a local NPR affiliate show today with Amanda Hess (in a previously recorded interview) and Emily Graslie (with me in the second half). Each of us has had things to say recently about women… women and online harassment, women in science communication, women and tokenism. As the [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

The Nature 10, and Where To Go From Here

Yesterday was a pretty big day for me. I was named as one of the Nature 10 for 2013, and one of my posts made it into the Best Online Science Writing of 2013 (AKA The Open Lab) – that’s three years in a row I’ve been in that anthology. I cannot thank you all [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Be My New Buddy: Illinois Anthropology is Hiring

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign seeks to hire a biological anthropologist for a full-time (nine-month) tenure-track or tenured position at the level of Assistant or Associate Professor. Target start date is August 16, 2014. We are interested in candidates with established research programs in Life History Theory, Human Ecology, [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Canopy Meg Moving to Greener Pastures

You may know I’ve been paying some attention to the restructuring at the North Carolina Nature Research Center and how that has affected Dr. Meg Lowman, also known as Canopy Meg. So…Matt Shipman shared this story with me on my Facebook wall today: Top state museum scientist leaving Nature Research Center Go read the whole [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Beware Attack Troll: Share Your Most Notable

Trigger warning for graphic description of internet harassment. * * * We science writers all have our favorite troll comments. For me, they are the ones that claim I don’t know my topic, that tell me what I should have written, that criticize my tone rather than my content. The commenter that said my child [...]

Keep reading »
Context and Variation

Integrating Research and Education: LEE Students Write About Their Experience

We’ve been trying to revive the Laboratory for Evolutionary Endocrinology (LEE) blog this year so that our lab puts out a bit more content. This month, graduate student Mary Rogers shares her experiences with our pilot project in a local girls science camp. Next month two of my undergrads will share additional posts on the [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Do You Have a 2-Body Problem? Yes, You Do [Poll Results]

Credit: Jen Christiansen

Physics students learn about the so-called two-body problem early in their training, a classical mechanics scenario that can be used to describe the motion of binary stars or a planet orbiting a star. But any romantic couple knows that they too must solve this problem, at least metaphorically, when it comes to deciding between partner [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Knowledge, Knowledge Everywhere: Do Social Networks Spread or Drown Health & Science News?

Southwell_Picture

We live in an age of constant data. Between television, the Internet, and  our “real-life” social circles, society has never before had as much access to health and science news as we now enjoy — and it has never been so easy for anyone to access an entire encyclopedia of information about any health or [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Rest In Peace, Nalini Ambady.

nalinigray

Yesterday, the field of Social Psychology lost a true pioneer. Nalini Ambady, professor of psychology at Stanford, passed away at the far-too-young age of 54 after a long battle with leukemia. She was the first Indian-American woman to teach psychology at Harvard, Tufts, and Stanford, and she is best known for her groundbreaking work on [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Outside the Ivory Tower: Science Writing, Social Media, and Non-Painful Networking.

SciAmBloggers

On Friday, I was invited by a friend at Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington to give a talk to an undergraduate colloquium about Science Writing/Blogging and how students might be able to pursue it as a potential career path. As part of the talk, I was asked to share details about my personal experience (how [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Psychology’s brilliant, beautiful, scientific messiness.

Book_Heart_by_antsandneedles

Today, sitting down to my Twitter feed, I saw a new link to Dr. Alex Berezow’s old piece on why psychology cannot call itself a science. The piece itself is over a year old, but seeing it linked again today brought up old, angry feelings that I never had the chance to publicly address when [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Bring Cognitive Science To The Streets!

The Think Tank

How much would you love something that could manage to combine psychology, bright colors, social justice, and a cute, wordplay1 name? Enter: The Think Tank. Brain child of Tyler Alterman, the Think Tank is a “mobile cognitive science lab and education station” that will drive around to schools and museums across the country, focusing on [...]

Keep reading »
The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 2: Automatic ‘othering’

Hermie fig1

Please welcome the second in the guest post series, the fantastic D-list monktress, Hermitage! So, I’m one of the ‘bloggers you’ve never heard of’ that Scicurious has graciously invited to be part of her diversity guest post series. Which Sci made very clear is supposed to be an uplifting outlet for all of the e-rage [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

The Doctor Is In

Original image by Charles M. Schulz/Peanuts.

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

A Psychologist Goes To The Zoo: An Interview with Terry L. Maple

20111120-IMG_3366

I first became aware of Dr. Terry L. Maple when I read his article in the latest issue of The Observer, the magazine of the Association for Psychological Science. Maple is former president and CEO of the Zoo Atlanta as well as the Palm Beach Zoo, and is currently a professor in the departments of [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Rule #1: Giving Talks

[Data collection fortnight ends today. And then we shall return to our regularly scheduled programming. Until then, here's Rule #1, from the archives.] If you are giving a talk, or teaching a class, or are otherwise responsible for transmitting content from your brain to other peoples’ brains, you should be able to give that talk [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Wordless Wednesday: Pouched Rat having a treat

African Giant Pouched rat Gambian Pouched rat Cricetomys ansorgei in a cage

This is a video recording of me introducing a new snack to the African Giant Pouched Rats (Cricetomys ansorgei) – fresh pumpkin seeds. This fellow really seems to like it. I’m super impressed by this species dexterity. His handling of this seeds shows that. This is just a snap shot of an experiment I am [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Dr Caleph Wilson and 1st Generation STEM

caleph_wilson_1366813144_03

The hashtag #ScholarSunday is very much like #FollowFriday or #FF for short. Dr. Raul Pacheco (@RaulPacheco and raulpacheco.org). He created it as a vehicle for academics to engage with each other and alert our Twitter followers to who the intelligent, thought-provoking, and awesome colleagues we follow to keep us on our toes, challenge our assumptions [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Google Doodle Honors Chemist Dr. Percy Julian

percy-julians-115th-birthday-born-1899-5688801926053888-hp

April 11, 2014 would have been Dr. Julian Percy’s 115th Birthday and it was a beautiful site to behold – seeing today’s Google Doodle honoring the man and his science. “Dr. Julian’s story is a fascinating one and I encourage you to read over the ACS and Wikipedia entries. As you might imagine, he faced [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Wordless Wednesday: Research Snapshots 4

Snack time.

Because I know you all have missed seeing the rats. Here are some photos of the most adorable research subjects, EVER!! These photos are from novel food introduction tests.   He has a treat (the green alfalfa cube in the lower right part of the frame) but he is getting into pre-nap posture. Hey, I’m [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

#Scio14 Expanding the Dialogue on Diversity: Privilege and the Pursuit of Science

BBW do science

As I was completing my doctorate studies, I was mounting an insane amount of student debt. I needed to finish. I wanted to finish. However, working an outside job or even a teaching assistantship kept taking up mind space and time and prevented me from just getting things done. I was so financially strapped that I was [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Twitter, Black Women, and Graduate Education – a place for a dispersed community

DNLee headshot 12

I know about a little over dozen African-American Women with or earning a Ph.D. I count both real life friend and on-line associates. When I list them in a Twitter #FollowFriday list it looks like a lot. (BTW, you should follow @TheNaturalHaven, @DrFayOnline, @Lachelle_Dawn, @LuceliaCherie, @DrRubidium, @astroholbrook, @artfulaction, @alondra, @dr_tindall, @BlackDocs, @CoquiNegra, @artcoholic, @meinhermitage, @katellington).  But it’s [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Speaking my mind and signing my name

DNLee headshot 12

I wrote an essay as part of a Group Post at #HopeJahrenSureCanWrite about being your authentic self – name and all – on the internet. Five science bloggers, @HopeJahren, @DNLee5, @JBYoder, @kejames & @hormiga, each of different academic ranks and each with our own ‘vulnerabilities’ share our stories of why we write, but perhaps more importantly [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Wordless Wednesday: #DNLeeLab Research Snapshots 2

The Urban Scientist

My Story Collider Story – Working Twice as Hard

sclogo

I must extend a very, very big thank you to Ben Lillie and Erin Barker of The Story Collider and giving me a chance to share my personal experiences in and with science. Story Collider is an amazing program and vehicle for sharing science stories. If you get a chance to attend or participate, then [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Applications open for undergrad mentoring & travel awards to attend the Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting May 2014

SWS 2014 Mentoring Award flyer

The Society of Wetland Scientists provides travel awards and career mentoring to undergraduates from underrepresented groups at its annual meeting. The Society brings the students to our national meeting and matches them with mentors for the duration of the meeting. The goal is to increase diversity in wetland science fields. Are you an undergraduate student [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American MIND iPad

Give a Gift & Get a Gift - Free!

Give a 1 year subscription as low as $14.99

Subscribe Now >>

X

Email this Article

X