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Wordless Wednesday: Research Snapshots 8 – taking measurements

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Research snaphots from what’s active on my desk right now. Yes, this is what has my attention these days – anogenital distances, AGD. Simple basic physical measures of anatomy of AGD can tell scientists a lot of important information about a species. In most mammaliam species AGD is a dimorphic – meaning different in size in males and females. In many rodent species the AGD gives some very important clues into the hormonal and physiological environment pups experienced in utero when mom was pregnant.

Young male pouched rat getting anogenital distance measured

Older male pouched rat getting anogenital distance measured

 

Young female pouched rat getting her anogenital distance measured

Older female getting her anogenital distance measured.

I’m just cataloging numbers and photos now. But some very interesting questions and hypotheses are popping up in my head. Stay tuned!

DNLee About the Author: DNLee is a biologist and she studies animal behavior, mammalogy, and ecology . She uses social media, informal experiential science experiences, and draws from hip hop culture to share science with general audiences, particularly under-served groups. Follow on Twitter @DNLee5.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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