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The Urban Scientist


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Science Bloggers for Students Update – third of the way there


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The competition has been intense. Fourteen teams and over $10,000 has been raised so far.  Last year’s winning team, Freethought Blog, has got some catching up to do.  Right now, the Ocean and Geobloggers are serving everybody, even my own Scientific American Team. Really? What do they have that we don’t have?

Science Bloggers for Students tally as of 2pm CST Thursday, October 25, 2012

(click to enlarge)

So, I’m rallying the troops, beating the bushes, and canvassing! My original call to arms here. I stated that I wanted to raise $1000 to support teachers and students.  With help from generous donors like @DocFreeRide, A Kessler, Tracey Friley, V Bobadilla, K Bisbee, Smoove 188, P Midford plus the DonorsChoose Friends & Family Foundation and the Horace Mann Foundation for matching donations, I’m over a third of the way to reaching my goal.

Thank you. Thank you very much. And the teachers are appreciative. They have thanked donors for their generosity as well.

I’m asking for everyone’s help in getting over the top and getting each of these amazing and worthwhile projects fully funded before the campaign ends in 1 days. Eeek! That’s soon.

Please visit my Giving Page: The Urban Scientist Giving Page and make a contribution. Any amount is accepted and greatly appreciated.

Double-down on your donation!  Try your Employer/Company name. to see if your employer participates in a Matching program. Many major companies and corporations do.

And there are Weekly match codes for some projects. Tweet @DonorsChoose for information about match codes. They tend to change each week.

Let’s get this money!

DNLee About the Author: DNLee is a biologist and she studies animal behavior, mammalogy, and ecology . She uses social media, informal experiential science experiences, and draws from hip hop culture to share science with general audiences, particularly under-served groups. Follow on Twitter @DNLee5.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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