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The Urban Scientist


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It’s on! Science Blogger Challenge 2012

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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Starting today, Monday, October 15th through November 5th, science bloggers from far and wide will compete to deliver the most supplies to students across the country. And I am on a mission. Yes. Yes, I am!

Like all of my colleagues (now competitors) I care about quality science education and outreach and access for all students.  I am also an advocate for public education.  I’ve been witnessing a decline in public education in general and science and math education in particular and see the worst of it in inner-city schools.  I care about these issues. It is very personal to me.  I want more kids who may not have considered a future in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics to be contenders. I want to see more kids from neighborhoods like the one I grew up in have a fighting chance to get into college, do well, get scholarships, and graduate. Then I want to see them go on to get great-paying jobs, get into grad school (or professional school) and kick ass and create a new normal in our old ‘hoods’ and in this nation.

So I’m lobbying hard. HARD. I want to raise $1000 for high school life science classes.  I am asking my readers and your friends and online connections to help me raise this money.

I’m also lobbying hard to my peers in the blogging communities of color. I’m one of a handful of science/engineering bloggers of color and I am fortunate enough to have a pretty big soap box to stand on and shout from.  So, for the next 3 weeks I will be in beast mode campaigning for these kids.

I want to raise A LOT of Money for in need Science Classrooms. My target will be urban classrooms looking for equipment/supplies for ecology, environmental sciences, and life sciences.

My top projects have been hand-picked by me, and I want to shine the spot light on them.

1. Creating Scientists in the Heart of Memphis, TN: Ms Wallace’s Biology and AP Biology Class, Melrose High School, Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis is my hometown.  I believe in these students and I know that if I made it, then they can too. I want them to have the same chances I did.

2. Let’s Get Visual…Visual: Ms. Dupree’s Science Class, River Gardens High School in St. Louis, Missouri

3. Hawks in Need of Science Notebooks: Mrs. Bober’s  Biology Class, Hazelwood Central High School in St. Louis Metro area, Missouri

St. Louis is my second home.  It was when I spent time working with high school students in this city that my concern for quality science education opportunities were crystallized. I met so many bright students, but the teachers were struggling for resources. I want to see this change.

4. Biology Will Not Be the Same Without You: Mr Estrada’s Biology Class, Valley Alternative Magnet School, Van Nuys, California

On the first afterschool activities I did was a hands-on dissection. The students were thrilled to ‘real science’. Typically, inner-city school students don’t have a chance to do a dissection and they miss out on chance to learn science on a deeper level or get the requisite experiences to successfully compete at a higher level.

I’m ready to change the equation. Are you? Will you help me raise these funds and inspire the net generation of scientists?


Trick Love the Kids and so do I.

Please Donate now. The Urban Scientist Giving Page on DonorsChoose.

DNLee About the Author: DNLee is a biologist and she studies animal behavior, mammalogy, and ecology . She uses social media, informal experiential science experiences, and draws from hip hop culture to share science with general audiences, particularly under-served groups. Follow on Twitter @DNLee5.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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