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Checking in: good news, bad news, great news

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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I just want you all to know that I have NOT fallen off of the face of the earth.  Two major online news stories hit and I started (but never finished posts for them) – one about that Black Studies mess at the Chronicle of Higher Education (check out @TressieMC‘s Inferiority of Blackness as  Subject to get o speed). and the other about the death of Beastie Boy MCA – you know the one with raspy voice – mmmmm DDDRRRRRRRRRROP!  The first story got me heated. The second story really upset me.  I’ll still complete those blog posts, I just wanted to check in with you all.

There a good news, too that I missed.  I would have been blogging and re tweeting in real time.  So here I am dropping links and showing inter-disciplinary love for my science tweeps.

For example @astroholbrook is in the final throes of a really great Kickstarter Campaign: Black Sun: Documentary Film about the 2012 Solar Eclipses. Dr. Jarita Holbrook, is documenting the work of Dr. Aplhonse Sterling of NASA and Dr. Hakeem Oluseyi who are studying the eclipse of the sun.  It’s an awesome research program and the documentary is as well. So, I’m encouraging everyone to check it out and contribute. Less than a week to go.

Plus, my girl and Curly Hair Mafia Ace, @DrRubidium was guest blogging at io9.  She dropped some gems all weekend long.
Drop the base to make bagels more delectable
How did they really die? Reinvestigating the deaths of the famous and infamous
Chemists create multiple Death Stars, Dark Side rejoices
The most badass physicist you’ve probably never heard of
and my FAVORITE >> Why Facehuggers Make Great Science Teachers (check this one out first!!!)

So what wast I doing instead? I was busy meeting my new niece.

Thanks to a last minute call, I was allowed to go into the deliver room with my sister and witness her C-Section and baby delivery. It was so awesome!

My sister had a c-section. This is the doctors fiddling with the umbilical cord.

Fresh out of the womb. So fresh, but not so clean

It was gross and messy and exciting.  I tried not to be too obnoxious. But I’m a science communicator. I live to document and share stuff like this!

Me, suited up to go in to delivery with my younger sister

I walked around in my paper scrubs for the longest time.  I walked out into the waiting room searching for my brother-in-law to tell him how it went.  I was replaying scenes from Doctor television shows.  I felt so empowered. I kept saying to myself, “Yes, yes I am Dr. Lee.” But okay, okay, okay, I’m not *that kind* of doctor. LOL.

I’m back in Oklahoma and I’ve been grinding like crazy. I’ve got to get out of this town this summer.  I’m so excited about going to Tanzania this summer to study African Giant Pouched Rats up close. So I’ve been trying to get my research equipment and supplies ordered.  I’ve been thinking about all of the stuff I’ll need to do make everything go well. Plus, it crossed my mind that this will also be an awesome outreach opportunity. So, I’m getting some things hammered out.  I’m crafting a proposal for a crowdfunded science outreach project while I’m there. Stay tuned. I’ll be reaching out to all of you for assistance and support.

DNLee About the Author: DNLee is a biologist and she studies animal behavior, mammalogy, and ecology . She uses social media, informal experiential science experiences, and draws from hip hop culture to share science with general audiences, particularly under-served groups. Follow on Twitter @DNLee5.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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