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The Urban Scientist


A hip hop maven blogs on urban ecology, evolutionary biology & diversity in the sciences
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Science, Social Media, #SciComm and Sunny San Diego

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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Your Hip Hop Maven of Science is bustin’ a move this weekend and headed to San Diego, California.  I received an invite to attend the 2012 Experimental Biology Conference. Experimental Biology is one of the largest life sciences professional conferences — 14,000 attendees.  It’s a convocation of several scientific societies under the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB).  I am honored to be speaking at a Science Communication Symposium sponsored by the American Physiological Society (APS), and sharing the dais with the most amazing superstars in online science outreach, EVAH!

I am beyond excited about this.  Plus, it gives me a very new arena to network with others — FASEB Biologists. I’m a biologist and do experiments, but for whatever reason, my science societies aren’t members of the ‘Experimental Biology sect. FASEB membership includes science societies that focus on applied biology in the health biomedical related research arenas.  All of my science societies are part of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) — yeah, I know the names certainly don’t help clear things up. But AIBS societies are more of the basic biology societies covering alot of the taxonomy, natural history, agriculture, and natural resources fields.  I can see how they are different.  However, in the last year, I’ve become acquainted with FASEB and some of its member organizations. And I have to say this much, FASEB offers an incredible amount of support (financial and otherwise) to students and junior professionals.  FASEB has an undeniable committement to diversity and inclusion in STEM and higher education. FASEB sponsors a number of minority access programs such as the Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) and has a very strong presence at the SACNAS and ABRCMS annual meetings.  Thanks to Alberto Roca of Minority Postdoc.org for introducing me to these amazing organizations and facilitating my attendance to each.

In fact, I’ll be presenting a version of this talk at APS: Blogging, Tweeting, & Writing: How an Online Presence can Impact Science and Your Career.  But since the goal of the panel is provide wisdom to thec rowd, I expect it be very interactive.  And I know my co-panelists, it’ll sure to be as much fun as it is informative.  In fact, they’ve each made announcements.
Jason Goldman – Science and Social Media at Experimental Biology in San Diego
Dr. Isis – Sessions of Interest at #EB2012
PH Lane – Packing for #EB2012 (which reminds me to pack some ‘nice clothes’ for this trip).

Some folks have asked about live streaming. I’m not sure about that, but you can follow the hashtag #apsComm and us on twitter @DNLee5, @DrIsis, @PHLane, @JGold85. We’re speaking at 3 pm PST.

Some other #SciComm friends will be at #EB2012 – the official hashtag of the meeting – such as @SciCurious whose an official blogger for the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics,@hapsci, official meeting blogger for ASBMB, and @Comprendia who is co-hosting an event with ASBMB at the meeting. Can’t wait to see all of these great people and many more.

Also check out: Experimental Biology @ExpBio and American Physiology Society Executive Director @ExecDirectorAPS

Although, there won’t be many talks or posters in my specific field, I am a science nerd in general. I love learning new things. So I have no doubt I’ll be engaged, plus I’m a complete nut for Exhibit Hall Swag.  However, I am looking forward to any presentations on physiology ad behavior and I’ve got my eye out for anyone who does ANY kind of bio-behavior work with rodents. I’ve got some experimental design work to do and I think I can get some new insight from researchers who see things a little differently than I do.  So all in all, I’m looking forward to the entire thing: the presenting, the presentations, the networking, the professional development (and the partying). Ha!

DNLee About the Author: DNLee is a biologist and she studies animal behavior, mammalogy, and ecology . She uses social media, informal experiential science experiences, and draws from hip hop culture to share science with general audiences, particularly under-served groups. Follow on Twitter @DNLee5.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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