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The Urban Scientist

The Urban Scientist


A hip hop maven blogs on urban ecology, evolutionary biology & diversity in the sciences
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    DNLee DNLee is a biologist and she studies animal behavior, mammalogy, and ecology . She uses social media, informal experiential science experiences, and draws from hip hop culture to share science with general audiences, particularly under-served groups. Follow on Twitter @DNLee5.
  • Going to #NABJ14 and I’m bringing #SciComm with me!

    NABJ14 logo

    I am en route to Boston, headed to the 2014 National Association of Black Journalists Meeting in July 30– August 3, 2014. The Theme is Revolution to Evolution, Shaping Our Future and I will be there representing Science! I believe that a science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) communication are revolution. Deliberately and consciously communicating [...]

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    Wordless Wednesday: Research Snapshots 8 – taking measurements

    Young female pouched rat getting her anogenital distance measured

    Research snaphots from what’s active on my desk right now. Yes, this is what has my attention these days – anogenital distances, AGD. Simple basic physical measures of anatomy of AGD can tell scientists a lot of important information about a species. In most mammaliam species AGD is a dimorphic – meaning different in size [...]

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    Interested in Science Communication? Apply for Science Writers 2014 Diversity Travel Fellowship

    SciWri14-splash

    Interested in Science Communication? Are you a scientist or engineer interested in science communication and journalism? Are you a journalist interested in covering more science, tech, health, medicine, nutrition, environment or engineering news? Are you a student majoring in journalism, communication or science, engineering? Either way, it doesn’t matter. If you are interested in science, [...]

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    You Should Know: July 29, 1972 Important date in Bioethics, Science and Black History

    Dr. Breland Noble and Dr. Benjamin

    The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment was an infamous clinical study that began in 1932, conducted by the Public Health Service at the Tuskegee Institute. July 29, 1972, it was revealed to the world and it came to an end. Peter Buxton, US Public Health Service worker had filed several reports about this unethical research. He blew [...]

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    Urban Science Adventure: Catching and Watching Fireflies

    firefly lightening bug

    What do you see when you go into your backyard in the evening time?  Most people don’t even think about being outside at that time until the warm rays of summer touch their skins.  Summer nights mean warm nights where you can be outside until dusk and beyond and see the wonders that Mother Nature [...]

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    You Should Know: Dr Robin G Nelson

    spotlight-searchlight-RGN

    Welcome to the tenth installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. Introducing … Dr. Robin G. Nelson Dr. Nelson is a Biological Anthropologist whose research explores family dynamics and how they may impact the health of individuals and communities. She [...]

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    Sports and Sharks – James Jones and South Florida youth go deep for science outreach

    Sharktagging RJ Dunlap Lab

    NBA Player James Jones, formerly with the Miami Heat, is spending time with the youth he serves through his foundation tagging sharks. Yes! TAGGING. SHARKS! DOING SCIENCE! And having a ball. They spent the day on a research boat with the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program affiliated with the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of [...]

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    Wordless Wednesday: Making Panyabuuku Plans

    Cricetomys ansorgei African Giant pouched rat in a pot

    I’m in planning mode for my return trip to Tanzania to study African Giant Pouched Rats, Cricetomys ansorgei This is what I spend a good portion of my time doing, live-trapping and capturing pouched rats, called panyabuuku, in the wild. This is what I actually have in store for me – literally! A large pile [...]

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    You Should Know: Stephani Page and #BLACKandSTEM

    Spotlight Stephani Page

    Welcome to the ninth installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. Introducing … Stephani Page and #BLACKandSTEM. #BLACKandSTEM started as a hashtag that quickly became a twitter community. The #BLACKandSTEM blog is connected to the weekly discussions or ‘Twitter chats’ that happen [...]

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    Urban Science Adventure: Appreciating Bees

    SDC18382

    Now is the time to get outdoors and experience what the world has to offer. One thing that you can keep in mind is that there are insects everywhere, including our back yards! A simple past time that you can enjoy alone, with a group, or with your family is taking a step outdoors and [...]

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