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Posts Tagged "tool use"

Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: Tool use, Parasitic siblings, Facial expressions, Settlers, and Gaslighting

An eclectic collection from my ResearchBlogging.org column this week, but all well worth the read: At EvoAnth, Adam Benton wonders whether human ancestors may have mastered tool use earlier than we think. He shares research (containing admittedly scant evidence) that includes a nice discussion of the challenges of this data. Sarah Jane Alger of The [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Is Orangutan Culture Made of Ideas?

sumatran orang

The chimpanzee’s clever use of sticks to fish for termites is fairly well known. In 1964, Jane Goodall announced her groundbreaking discovery to the world, writing in the journal Nature, “During three years in the Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve in Tanganyika, East Africa, I saw chimpanzees use natural objects as tools on many occasions. These [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Clever Captive Cockatoo Creates Tool, A First For His Species

Cockatoo_tools_4_AUERSPERG

A captive parrot in an Austrian research lab near Vienna has started using tools, adding to a complex story that began more than fifty years ago in the forests of Tanzania. “During three years in the Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve in Tanganyika, East Africa, I saw chimpanzees use natural objects as tools on many occasions,” [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

For Chimps, Tool Choice Is A Weighty Matter

chimp nuts currbio

A juvenile chimpanzee in the Ivory Coast’s Tai Forest watches as her mother carefully places a soft coula nut onto a hard, flat rock. In her other hand, mom has a chunk of hard wood. Mom smashes the nut with her makeshift hammer, once, twice, three times. Having broken the outer shell, she plucks out [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Dogs, But Not Wolves, Use Humans As Tools

Wolf

Sometime between fifteen and thirty thousand years ago, probably in the Middle East, the long, protracted process of domestication began to alter the genetic code of the wolf, eventually leaving us with the animals we know and love as domestic dogs. While there are several different theories as to exactly how dog domestication began, what [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Dingoes Ate My Nametag: Tool Use in a Dingo

Dingo_on_the_road

Each morning, a nametag would turn up missing. They went missing at some point during the nights, when nobody was around to notice. Each time one went missing, of course, it would be replaced. Nametags were essential in Bradley Philip Smith’s place of business. Every time he replaced a lost nametag with a new one, [...]

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