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Posts Tagged "teaching"

@ScientificAmerican

The Scientist Corps: 1,000 Scientists in 1,000 Days

Improving science education is not just important to me as the editor in chief of a science magazine for the usual reasons of maintaining our country’s well-being and global competitiveness: It’s also very personal. I have two school-age daughters myself—and they think science is cool. So when I got the top editor’s job at Scientific [...]

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Culturing Science

It only takes one day: bringing scientists into the classroom

“I have an idea,” my brother said to me last winter. Jacob is an elementary science teacher at a neighborhood charter school in Northeast Philadelphia and, at the time, I was working as a lab technician in the same city. “How would you like to come into my classroom and talk to my students about [...]

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Observations

Can Children Teach Themselves?

ted.com/sugata

Sugata Mitra gave street kids in a slum in New Delhi access to a computer connected to the Internet, and found that they quickly taught themselves how to use it. This was the moment he says he discovered a new way of teaching. He calls it the grandmother technique, and it goes like this: expose [...]

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Roots of Unity

In Praise of Proofs by Contradiction that Aren’t

Opposing arrows, a common conclusion to a proof by contradiction.

If you don’t know what to do, do something. That’s one of my mottos when I teach math (and it’s probably good life advice too). Last year, I taught introductory analysis (basically calculus with the juicy bits left in), one of the first proof-oriented classes students take. Writing proofs is hard, and sometimes the hardest [...]

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Roots of Unity

What Is the Goal of a Math History Class?

An illustration from Oliver Byrne's 1847 edition of Euclid's Elements. Image: Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

I’ll be teaching a math history class for the first time this semester. I’m excited to be teaching it, but I’ve noticed that preparing for this class has been very different from preparing for other classes I’ve taught, which have all been math content courses. I know how to teach a math content course. I [...]

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Roots of Unity

What T.S. Eliot Told Me about the Chain Rule

T.S. Eliot, who probably never thought about the chain rule while he was writing poetry. Photograph by Lady Ottoline Morrell. Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons.

“We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time.” —from Little Gidding by T.S. Eliot If you took calculus in high school or college, you might remember the chain rule. One of the main topics in calculus [...]

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Roots of Unity

Can a Closed Set Be Open? Can an Open Set Be Closed? When Math and Language Collide

A set that is neither open nor closed. The solid arc on the top of the half circle indicates that the boundary is included in the set, while the dotted line at the bottom indicates that the boundary is not included in the set. This set could also be described as the set of all points (x,y) that are less than or equal to 1 unit away from the point (0,0) and have a strictly positive y-coordinate. Image: Evelyn Lamb.

I gave my first midterm last week. I’m teaching a roughly junior level class for math majors, one of their first classes that is mostly focused on proofs rather than computations or algorithms. It is more abstract than most math classes they’ve taken up to this point. I love teaching this class because a class [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Teen Builds Gateway to the Brain for Girls

Girls run on a brain maze

The Synapse Project “encourages young women to enter the field of neuroscience through information and mentorship,” according to its website. This endeavor, an amalgam of outlets for kids, information for teens and career advice for young women, turns out to be the brainchild of … a child, one keenly interested in the brain. Sixteen-year-old Grace [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Social and Emotional Learning Empowers Children

Editor’s note: The below is a response to a critique of MindUP, a social and emotional learning program pioneered by actor Goldie Hawn. I have covered this program in other blogs (see list below) and in a feature in Scientific American Mind (visit “Schools Add Workouts for Attention, Grit and Emotional Control”). I hope this [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

How Social and Emotional Learning Could Harm Our Kids

Editor’s note: The following is a critique of a social and emotional learning program called MindUP that I have covered in other blogs (see list below) and in a feature in Scientific American Mind (visit “Schools Add Workouts for Attention, Grit and Emotional Control”).  Please also read a response to this critique, posted separately, from [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

The Education of Character: Carefully Considering Craisins [Video]

Mindfulness, the practice of being present and in the moment, is easier for some people than for others. But it is a skill that many believe is worth cultivating—some say, starting with children. Preventing your mind from taking you into the past or future can, after all, be an antidote to depression (which can result [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Engaging Undergrads with Wikipedia

Longtime science blog readers will certainly remember the popular cognitive psychology blog Cognitive Daily, written by Greta and Dave Munger, that had a fantastic five-year run at Scienceblogs. While Dave is still involved in the science blogging community through projects like Research Blogging and Science Seeker, and of course writing his own blogs, Greta has [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Rule #1: Giving Talks

[Data collection fortnight ends today. And then we shall return to our regularly scheduled programming. Until then, here's Rule #1, from the archives.] If you are giving a talk, or teaching a class, or are otherwise responsible for transmitting content from your brain to other peoples’ brains, you should be able to give that talk [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Addressing Disparity in STEM & other subjects in American Education #AfAmEdChat

301012_2360493416353_853915_n

Mark your calendars. November 18-22, 2013, is American Education Week. Created (in part) by the National Education Association in 1921 it “presents all Americans with a wonderful opportunity to celebrate public education and honor individuals who are making a difference in ensuring that every child receives a quality education.” In celebration and reflection of 2013 [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Epic Science Rap Battle Sets the DNA Discovery Record Straight: Rosalind Franklin vs. Watson & Crick

Guest post to The Urban Scientist Sam Díaz-Muñoz

Let’s remember that science is a human endeavor and it’s steeped in the context and sometimes messiness of the geo-socio-politico-economic backgrounds of the time and place of the work and discovery. The field of genetics has truly changed the game (of life sciences). Some of the same frustrating dilemmas affecting scientists from underrepresented groups were [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Scientists’ Support for Kiera Wilmot #Solidarity4Wilmot

KW soli

Here’s what we now know. Kiera Wilmot was re-creating the Drano Aluminum foil experiment at school. She was outside, before the morning bell. She recreated one of those Wow! Science experiments, the kind we see on Myth Busters or You’ve Been Warned! Folks love those shows. They love doing that crazy stuff at home (although [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Florida teen charged with felony for trying science

News of Kiera Wilmot’s arrest has seriously unnerved me. She is the Florida high school student who was experimenting with common household chemicals in science class that resulted in a minor explosion. There were no injuries and no damage to school property; however, she was taken away in handcuffs, formally arrested and expelled from school. [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Spit a Rhyme, Drop Some Science

Kicking it my bro, Chris Emdin at Columbia College Teachers College. He.Is.So.DOPE!

Hip Hop Education is taking over the world. My brother in science and hip hop Dr. Chris Emdin and The GZA of Wu-Tang have rolled out an amazing science education and engagement platform: Science Genius B.A.T.T.L.E.S.  High School students create rhymes and battle each other to demonstrate not only their MC prowess but science comprehension [...]

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The Urban Scientist

A Dream Deferred: How access to STEM is denied to many students before they get in the door good

A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes What happens to a dream deferred? Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore– And then run? Does it stink like rotten meat? Or crust and sugar over– like a syrupy sweet? Maybe it just sags like a heavy load. Or does [...]

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The Urban Scientist

The complicated relationship of Economics & Education and how we conflate race & class issues in the United States

So even after Affirmative Action, there still weren’t very many Blacks and Mexican students enrolled in selective colleges and universities. Why? Because they didn’t meet the entry standards. That makes sense. But what isn’t thoroughly addressed (in this clip) is the reason why. Professor Lino Graglia admits he is not exactly sure why idea why [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Sexual Politics of Hip Hop Reexamined as Lessons in Sexual Selection

Bird Bee Twerker

I received the great honor of being invited to speak at the Dr. Laura C. Harris Symposium at Denison University. It’s a small (compared to OK State) Liberal Arts College in Granville, Ohio – outside of Columbus. The Symposium is sponsored by the Women’s Studies Department, and has been inviting interesting speakers across the academic [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Science Bloggers for Students 2012 raises over $25K

Donors Choose Urban Science Final

The Annual Philanthropic throw down of Science Bloggers is done and tally is in! Students WIN! Science Bloggers for Students raised $25,359 and 17,122 public school students were reached! Thanks to the kind and very generous support from our blog readers, 309 members plus the matching donations from other supporting DonorsChoose organizations such as the [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Science Bloggers for Students update, extended until November 9, 2012

There was a lot of activity in the last hours of the Science Bloggers for Students campaign last night.  It was better than any election coverage you’ll watch tonight.  Thanks to your help The Urban Scientist Giving Page we raised $962 dollars and helped 453 students. I feel great. Thank you, thank you, thank you. [...]

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