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Posts Tagged "sharks"

Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: Sharky speedos, Local language, and Suburban livin’

Part of my online life includes editorial duties at ResearchBlogging.org, where I serve as the Social Sciences Editor. Each Thursday, I pick notable posts on research in anthropology, philosophy, social science, and research to share on the ResearchBlogging.org News site. To help highlight this writing, I also share my selections here on AiP. Quite a [...]

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Compound Eye

An Interview with Christine Shepard, Shark Photographer

CSf

Anyone paying attention to science outreach in recent years will have learned a great deal about shark biology, whether they intended to or not. That’s because the University of Miami’s R. J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program, an active shark research group, communicates its efforts on a social media scale few other laboratories can match. Their tweets [...]

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Extinction Countdown

30 Percent of Sharks, Rays and Related Species at Risk of Extinction

Northern River Shark

The first worldwide analysis of the extinction threat of all sharks and related species has just been published, and the news is sobering. Of the 1,041 known species of chondrichthyan (cartilaginous) fishes—sharks, rays and deep-sea chimaera (aka ghost sharks)—more than 30 percent are endangered, threatened, vulnerable to extinction or near threatened. Another 46 percent lack [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Daggernose Shark

daggernose shark

These small sharks pose no threats to humans. The opposite, however, cannot be said. Species name: Daggernose shark (Isogomphodon oxyrhynchus). Notable for their flattened snouts and relatively large fins, these small (1.5 meter) sharks are the only members of their genus. Where found: The shallow coastal waters off of northeastern South America, where they predate [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Film Fakery: Does Shark Week Harm Conservation Efforts?

great white shark

Great White Serial Killer. World’s Deadliest Sharks. I Escaped Jaws. Sharkpocalypse. These are just a few of the programs airing this week during the Discovery Channel’s annual Shark Week and NatGeo Wild’s new copycat, Sharkfest. Undoubtedly these programs will attract their usual massive ratings, but they may be guilty of the same kinds of film [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Last Chance for Sawfish?

sawfish

All species of sawfish around the world could soon gain full protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, a move that comes just in time for the iconic but critically endangered creatures. Sawfish populations have dropped 90 to 99 percent over the past few decades, mostly because of coastal development in sawfish habitat and peoples’ [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Hammerhead Sharks, Houston Toads, Heavy Metal and Other Links from the Brink

great hammerhead shark

Rare sharks, toads, rhinos and bears are among the endangered species in the news this week. Hammer Time: David Shiffman offers 10 reasons why great and scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna mokarran and S. lewini) deserve Endangered Species Act protections and encourages people to take direct action in support of a move to do just that. [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Whale Sharks in the News: Citizen Science, Migration Revelations and High Fashion

whale shark

What do the world’s biggest fish and the Big Dipper have in common? Believe it or not, the answer is math. One of the same algorithms developed to help astronomers study the stars in the sky is being used to conserve and understand whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) under the sea. It turns out that each [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Hong Kong Imported 10 Million Kilograms of Shark Fins Last Year

The appearance of a shark fin piercing the ocean surface is often seen as a sign of danger to humans. Even more dangerous to sharks is the sight of a shark fin floating in a bowl of soup. Around the world, sharks are in crisis. Many species have suffered population declines of 90 to 99 [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Manta Rays Endangered by Sudden Demand from Chinese Medicine

Manta ray fishery

Demand for the gills of manta and mobula rays has risen dramatically in the past 10 years for use in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), even though they were not historically used for this purpose, a team of researchers from the conservation organizations Shark Savers and WildAid has discovered. “We first came across manta and mobula [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Could Farming Sustainable Tilapia Help Cut the Demand for Shark Fin Soup?

The unsustainable demand for the Chinese delicacy known as shark fin soup is directly responsible for the slaughter of more than 70 million sharks every year. In a process known as finning, the sharks are caught, pulled onto boats, stripped of their valuable fins and dumped back into the ocean where they slowly and painfully [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Shark-finning gangsters assault celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay

If you’ve ever watched shows like Hell’s Kitchen or Kitchen Nightmares, you’d know not to cross incendiary celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay. Well, maybe his shows don’t air in Taiwan, because a crew of Taiwanese shark-fin smugglers wasn’t too impressed by Ramsay’s reputation, holding the TV host at gunpoint and pouring gasoline over him during the [...]

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Observations

Human Antibodies Given Sharklike Armor to Fight Disease

A swimming shart

Human therapeutic antibodies often break down. Now chemists have grafted on more rugged features, taken from sharks

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Observations

Tiger sharks can relocate familiar hunting spots from several kilometers away

blacktip reef shark in habitat

Wandering the neighborhood randomly is not usually the best strategy to find a great dinner—especially if you live in a place where such meals are few and far between. The resulting trajectory, known in mathematics as "a random walk," does not always make for the best use of time and energy, particularly in locations where [...]

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Running Ponies

Thresher sharks tail-slap sardines into oblivion

thresher-shark-tail-slap

If you’re going to have a tail that stretches as long as your body, you might as well whack things with it. For years it’s been suspected that a small-mouthed, slender family of sharks called thresher sharks would actively use their disproportionately long tails for hunting, but until recently, no one had managed to film [...]

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Running Ponies

Prehistoric ghost shark Helicoprion’s spiral-toothed jaw explained

Helicoprion

After a century of colourful guesses, CT scans have revealed what’s really going on inside the nightmarish jaw of Helicoprion, a large, 270 million-year-old cartilaginous fish with an elaborate whorl of teeth set in the middle of its mouth. In 1899, Russian geologist, Alexander Petrovich Karpinsky, gave this six-metre-long fish the name Helicoprion, meaning “spiral [...]

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Tetrapod Zoology

Tales from the Cryptozoologicon: Megalodon!

Cropped version of John Conway's Megalodon image (scroll down for full version). From the soon-to-be-published Cryptozoologicon.

The other day I showcased some art and text from the upcoming Cryptozoologicon, a book currently being put together by John Conway, C. M. Kosemen and myself and scheduled to appear later this year. Today I want to do the same thing. This time, we’re going to look at the section on Megalodon, the Megatooth [...]

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