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"culture"21 articles archived since 1845

How Do You Figure Out How Chimps Learn? Peanuts.

What is culture? One simple definition might be: a distinctive behavior shared by two or more individuals, which persists over time, and that ignorant individuals acquire through socially-aided learning.

May 12, 2010 — Jason G. Goldman
Why Can't Gravity Believers and Skeptics Get Along?

Why Can't Gravity Believers and Skeptics Get Along?

Multiple media outlets around the world covered a study published last week in the journal Nature Climate Change.* This study sought to explain why "believers" in climate change cannot get along with "skeptics" and how "believers" can argue the matter better to convince "skeptics." Seems like a fascinating dive into the sociology of science, until [...]

February 11, 2015 — Paul Thacker

Darwin: the Movie

It’s true, Mr. and Ms. Hollywood Producer, Nash, Hawking, Turing were great and all, and their stories brought big bucks and a few Oscars rolling your way, but come on!

April 12, 2015 — Lawrence Rifkin
How many TV sets do you have—and why does it matter?

How many TV sets do you have—and why does it matter?

In the early nineties, researchers predicted that at the current rate of growth, there would be two televisions per US household by 1995. It’s probably safe to say that we have likely exceeded that prediction.

March 16, 2015 — Krystal D'Costa

A Plea for a Scientific Worldview from An Honest Liar, on Debunker James Randi

NEW YORK CITY—No matter how smart you are, or how educated you are, you can be deceived. That's the wisdom from—and what I gather is the driving force behind–James "The Amazing" Randi, the renowned illusionist, escape artist and debunker of psychics, spoon benders, faith healers and other charlatans willing to prey on others.

March 9, 2015 — Philip Yam

Where The Wild Things Are Growing (Part 1)

With its popularity growing in urban areas, foraging for wild foods has started to look more Portlandia than primitive. The practice hasn't always been viewed favorably; many prominent thinkers such as Thomas Hobbes viewed it as brutish, a sentiment later echoed in colonialist discourses.

June 3, 2014 — Layla Eplett

It’s True: We’re Probably All a Little Irish—Especially in the Caribbean

Everyone is supposedly a little Irish on St. Patrick's Day but there is more truth to this saying than most recognize. It's not merely a loophole allowing for the uninhibited consumption of Guinness. The Irish have traveled to all corners of the world, and like other immigrant groups, wherever they have stayed they have left a mark.

March 17, 2015 — Krystal D'Costa
Rice and Beans: How Does Culture Become Generic?

Rice and Beans: How Does Culture Become Generic?

About Rice and Beans: Following recent discussions on food here on Anthropology in Practice, this week I'll feature a four part series that explores the ways immigrant groups in Corona, NY are involved in creating generic versions of their cultures to support themselves.

May 11, 2015 — Krystal D'Costa
Rice and Beans: What Is the Difference Between Private and Public Culture?

Rice and Beans: What Is the Difference Between Private and Public Culture?

About Rice and Beans: Following recent discussions on food here on Anthropology in Practice, this week I'll feature a four part series that that explores the ways immigrant groups in Corona, NY are involved in creating generic versions of their cultures to support themselves.

May 12, 2015 — Krystal D'Costa
Why Can't Gravity Believers and Skeptics Get Along?

Why Can't Gravity Believers and Skeptics Get Along?

Multiple media outlets around the world covered a study published last week in the journal Nature Climate Change.* This study sought to explain why "believers" in climate change cannot get along with "skeptics" and how "believers" can argue the matter better to convince "skeptics." Seems like a fascinating dive into the sociology of science, until [...]

February 11, 2015