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"climate"

On Climate Surveys, the People Agree—Mostly [Interactive]

It’s interesting to see how different points can pique the interest of different people looking at the same data set. My colleague Mark Fischetti (senior editor and partner-in-crime for many of the Graphic Science items in the magazine) was intrigued by bipartisan agreement on questions related to global warming in the survey results shown in [...]

April 10, 2014 — Jen Christiansen
Cell Phones Monitor Water, Soil on African Farms [Q&A]

Cell Phones Monitor Water, Soil on African Farms [Q&A]

As a middle school student in Tallahassee, Florida, Kelly Caylor built a weather balloon for the science fair. Decades later, he's distributing high-tech environmental sensors, or "pods," throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

April 10, 2015 — Kerry Klein

EPA “got it right” on more stringent methane regulations

One of the big takeaway from the big UT Austin/Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) methane leakage study released today is emissions rates are actually lower in some parts of the production process than initially thought.

September 16, 2013 — David Wogan
The Road to Paris and COP-21

The Road to Paris and COP-21

As 2015 begins, the road to the crucial COP-21 summit here in Paris (where I am based) is being outlined by the French government, the UN, and a huge number of other actors and NGOs.

January 16, 2015 — Tali Trigg

Does Uber Make Cities More Energy Efficient?

It seems you can't read an article about new mobility or the sharing economy without stumbling across Uber; the mobility service that sprung up in 2009 to only five years later become valued at more than Avis, Hertz, or Sony.

November 21, 2014 — Tali Trigg
The Return to Nepal: In Search of Soot

The Return to Nepal: In Search of Soot

Editor's Note: This is the first installment in a new series by Ulyana Horodyskyj, who chronicled an earlier expedition to Nepal in a series called, "Climbing Mount Everest," which can be found by clicking here.

October 16, 2014 — Ulyana Horodyskyj
Turns Out There IS Something New Under the Sun

Turns Out There IS Something New Under the Sun

If there is anything new under the sun it has to be this – and delightfully, it’s the domain of the moon. This spectacular table by Adrien Segal captures tidal data collected from San Francisco Bay for the duration of a full lunar cycle, 29 days in April and May of 2006.

September 18, 2013 — Kalliopi Monoyios
“Consistent With Our Carbon Budgets”

“Consistent With Our Carbon Budgets”

That’s how Ed Davey, the United Kingdom’s Energy and Climate Minister, is describing the climate impacts of natural gas from shale formations: This report shows that the continued use of gas is perfectly consistent with our carbon budgets over the next couple of decades.

September 12, 2013 — David Wogan

Damage from Extreme Weather Increasing

Hurricane Irene is part of a worsening trend. Weather disasters have grown more frequent and more costly over the past 30 years in the U.S.,

September 1, 2011 — Christine Gorman

Indian Railways and Military Go Solar

There's been no shortage recently of big companies going big on solar, nor of middlemen trying to pave the way for bulk buying of solar power, but when the beast that is national procurement gets involved, the ante is upped.

April 15, 2015 — Tali Trigg
When David always beats Goliath

When David always beats Goliath

Perhaps I’m just out of touch or a just new school environmentalist, but I don’t agree with beating up on fossil fuels just because it’s the convenient thing to do.

October 2, 2013 — David Wogan
Renewable Energy Shines in 2014

Renewable Energy Shines in 2014

Looking back at 2014 through the prism of renewable energy, it's hard not to get bombastic. So many records were broken, corners turned, and with costs declining, it's hard not to wonder if 2015 will see renewable energy become nothing more than a fully competitive energy source, capturing more and more market share.

February 5, 2015 — Tali Trigg
Science on a Sphere & Falling in Love Again

Science on a Sphere & Falling in Love Again

This week, the only dedicated science illustration conference in the country is taking place in Boulder, CO. The Guild of Natural Science Illustrators’ annual gathering is in full swing and there are fascinating developments to convey.

July 16, 2014 — Kalliopi Monoyios
Full Frontal Nerdity

Full Frontal Nerdity

I was once caught staring at energy efficiency guru Amory Lovins' pocket protector, and without blinking he said, "Yes, it's full frontal nerdity." There was something refreshing about that sentiment, so let me similarly make my intentions clear: in joining SciAm Blogs, I hope to bring you some unnoticed news and engage you on a [...]

April 22, 2014 — Tali Trigg

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