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Posts Tagged "women in science"

@ScientificAmerican

Hangout with Canopy Researcher Margaret Lowman

Margaret Lowman of the California Academy of Sciences. Credit: Google Hangout On Air

Margaret Lowman, who also goes by the nickname “Canopy Meg,” is chief of science and sustainability at the California Academy of Sciences. Her research focuses on life and ecosystems at the top of the forest canopy in far-flung places, including the Amazon and Ethiopia. In a Google Science Fair Hangout On Air conversation with me, [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

A Message from Mariette DiChristina, Editor in Chief

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Scientific American bloggers lie at the heart of the SA website, pumping vitality, experience and broad insight around the community. Unfortunately our poor communication with this valuable part of the SA network over the recent days has led to concerns, misunderstandings and ill feelings, and we are committed to working to try to put this [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Science in Action Winner for 2013: Elif Bilgin

Elif Bilgin, winner of the 2013 Science in Action award, a $50,000 prize sponsored by Scientific American as part of the Google Science Fair.

“Genius,” Thomas Edison famously said, “is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.” He would have found a kindred spirit in Elif Bilgin, 16, of Istanbul, Turkey, winner of the 2013 $50,000 Science in Action award, part of the third annual Google Science Fair. The award honors a project that can make a practical difference [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

The Banana That Gave Its All for Science [Video]

Magicians need to resort to trick props to pull a rabbit out of a hat. But we pulled DNA out of a banana with nothing more than a few household ingredients during a Scientific American Google Hangout on December 20. (See Scientific American Goes Bananas on December 20. No artifice or foolery was involved: just [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

SA Biology Blogger Wins L’Oreal for Women in Science Fellowship

Christina Agapakis

The Miss America pageant is often judged to be somewhat of an insult to women. So I was once surprised to learn that the Miss America Organization is the world’s largest provider of scholarship assistance to younger women. A total of $45 million in cash and scholarships was given out last year by MAO and [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

A Busy 2011 at Scientific American

When I wrote my end-of-the-year update for staff, Bora Zivkovic, our chief blogs editor, reminded me that others are also interested in the goings on at Scientific American. It’s never a good idea to say no to Bora. So here’s a summary of some highlights for 2011: AWARDS We won a 2011 National Magazine Award [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Defends Marie Curie—and Women Scientists—in 1911

One of the pleasures of editing a magazine like Scientific American, with its 166-year history as the country’s longest continuously published magazine, is getting a “you are there” view of science as it was whenever I take a spin through our digital archives. The other day, while reading some 100-year-old prose, I was reminded of [...]

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Culturing Science

The Global Perspective of Space and Deep-sea Explorer Kathryn Sullivan

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There is currently a person on this planet who has traveled to outer space and to the deep sea. Many of us dream of one or the other; to dream of both at once seems overly ambitious or even greedy. But Kathryn Sullivan has done it. Kathryn was the first American woman to walk in [...]

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Doing Good Science

When your cover photo says less about the story and more about who you imagine you’re talking to.

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The choice of cover of the most recent issue of Science was not good. This provoked strong reactions and, eventually, an apology from Science‘s editor-in-chief. It’s not the worst apology I’ve seen in recent days, but my reading of it suggests that there’s still a gap between the reactions to the cover and the editorial [...]

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Doing Good Science

Successful science outreach means connecting with the people you’re trying to reach.

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Let’s say you think science is cool, or fun, or important to understand (or to do) in our modern world. Let’s say you want to get others who don’t (yet) see science as cool, or fun, or important, to appreciate how cool, how fun, how important it is. Doing that, even on a small scale, [...]

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Doing Good Science

Heroes, human “foibles”, and science outreach.

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“Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself. The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool.” – Richard Feynman There is a tendency sometimes to treat human beings as if they were resultant vectors arrived at by adding lots and lots of particular [...]

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Doing Good Science

Conduct of scientists (and science writers) can shape the public’s view of science.

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Scientists undertake a peculiar kind of project. In striving to build objective knowledge about the world, they are tacitly recognizing that our unreflective picture of the world is likely to be riddled with mistakes and distortions. On the other hand, they frequently come to regard themselves as better thinkers — as more reliably objective — [...]

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Doing Good Science

A suggestion for those arguing about the causal explanation for fewer women in science and engineering fields.

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People are complex, as are the social structures they build (including but not limited to educational institutions, workplaces, and professional communities). Accordingly, the appropriate causal stories to account for the behaviors and choices of humans, individually and collectively, are bound to be complex. It will hardly ever be the case that there is a single [...]

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Doing Good Science

Pub-Style Science: exclusion, inclusion, and methodological disputes.

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This is the second part of my transcript of the Pub-Style Science discussion about how (if at all) philosophy can (or should) inform scientific knowledge-building, wherein we discuss methodological disputes, who gets included or excluded in scientific knowledge-building, and ways the exclusion or inclusion might matter. Also, we talk about power gradients and make the [...]

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Doing Good Science

Nature and trust.

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Here are some things that I know: Nature is a high-impact scientific journal that is widely read in the scientific community. The editorial mechanisms Nature employs are meant to ensure the quality of the publication. Reports of scientific research submitted to Nature undergo peer review (as do manuscripts submitted to other scholarly scientific journals). As [...]

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Doing Good Science

Join Virtually Speaking Science for a conversation about sexism in science and science journalism.

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Today at 5 P.M. Eastern/2 P.M. Pacific, I’ll be on Virtually Speaking Science with Maryn McKenna and Tom Levenson to discuss sexual harassment, gender bias, and related issues in the world of science, science journalism, and online science communication. Listen live online or, if you have other stuff to do in that bit of spacetime, [...]

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Doing Good Science

On allies.

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Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. –George Santayana All of this has happened before, and all of this will happen again. –a guy who turned out to be a Cylon Let me start by putting my cards on the table: Jamie Vernon is not someone I count as an ally. [...]

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Doing Good Science

On the labor involved in being part of a community.

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On Thursday of this week, registration for ScienceOnline Together 2014, the “flagship annual conference” of ScienceOnline opened (and closed). ScienceOnline describes itself as a “global, ongoing, online community” made up of “a diverse and growing group of researchers, science writers, artists, programmers, and educators —those who conduct or communicate science online”. On Wednesday of this [...]

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Guest Blog

Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist

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It’s 11:47 am on the Sunday before Labor Day, and I’m staking out a LEGO store inside a Byzantine shopping mall on the outskirts of Boston. I am here with a coterie of children and parents, the lot of us waiting impatiently while three LEGO associates in black shirts and khakis make their last-minute preparations [...]

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Guest Blog

Can we declare victory for women in their participation in science? Not yet

"When will we know when we can declare victory? For years I proceeded on the assumption that victory was equal participation of men and women in all branches of science and engineering. Today I’m not so sure…. It’s possible that we will come to understand that some fraction of the asymmetries in the distribution of [...]

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Roots of Unity

Happy Birthday, Evelyn Boyd Granville!

Evelyn Boyd Granville in 1997. Image: Margaret Murray, via Mathematicians of the African Diaspora by Scott W. Williams.

Evelyn Boyd Granville, the second African American woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics, turns 90 today (May 1, 2014). I first heard her name in a talk by Patricia Kenschaft about African American mathematicians. Of course, having an affinity for the name Evelyn, she stuck in my mind, and when I found out her [...]

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Roots of Unity

Mathematics, Live: A Conversation with Victoria Booth and Trachette Jackson

This is the second in a series of interviews I have been doing for the Association for Women in Mathematics. (You can read my first interview, with dynamicists Laura DeMarco and Amie Wilkinson, here.) In my interviews, I’m “listening in” on a conversation between two women mathematicians. I talked with mathematical biologists Victoria Booth and [...]

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Roots of Unity

Mathematics+Motherhood: An Interview with Constance Leidy

Mathematician Constance Leidy and her daughter. Image: Constance Leidy.

This is a guest post from Lillian Pierce, who has been doing an interview series for the Association for Women in Mathematics. Her series has focused on women who are balancing motherhood with their mathematical careers. I found her interview with Constance Leidy very interesting, and I am grateful to Drs. Pierce and Leidy for [...]

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Roots of Unity

Introducing the Blog on Math Blogs

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I’m pleased to introduce a new American Mathematical Society blog: the Blog on Math Blogs! Over there, my co-editor Brie Finegold and I are featuring posts from around the math blogosphere to help you keep up with math news and find new math blogs to follow. We’ve been around for about two months now, and [...]

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Roots of Unity

Mathematics, Live: A Conversation with Laura DeMarco and Amie Wilkinson

"Concealed within his fortress, the lord of Mordor sees all. His gaze pierces cloud, shadow, earth, and flesh. You know of what I speak, Gandalf: a great Eye, lidless, wreathed in flame."

This year I’ve been co-writing “Mathematics, Live,” an interview series for the Association for Women in Mathematics newsletter. In my interviews I’m “listening in” on conversations between pairs of female mathematicians. The first interview appeared in the May/June issue of the newsletter (password required). In it, I talked with mathematicians Laura DeMarco of the University [...]

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Roots of Unity

Two Evelyns and a Katie: a Snapshot from AAAS

Evelyns from Texas will take over the world

When I was at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Boston last week, I popped by the American Junior Academy of Science poster session featuring the work of high school scientists. I’ll admit one of the reasons was because I saw an Evelyn from Texas in the abstract booklet. Being rather [...]

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Roots of Unity

Knotty Fun at the Joint Math Meetings

Anyone with necklaces or lace-up shoes has some first-hand experience with knots, but believe it or not (knot?), there is an entire mathematical discipline dedicated to studying knots and some closely related concepts. A mathematical knot is almost like a real-world knot, but it can’t have any ends. So if you’re thinking of a shoelace, [...]

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Voices

For Female Physicists, Peer Mentoring Can Combat Isolation

Our mentoring network of senior physics faculty at liberal arts institutions. Clockwise from top right: Linda Fritz, Cindy Blaha, Barbara Whitten and Anne Cox.

Women physicists are often isolated at work. Just consider the numbers: 86 percent of American faculty physicists are male; 89 percent of PhD physicists working in the science and engineering industry are male; and it was just in 2012 that the number of physics PhDs earned by women reached even 20 percent. To increase the [...]

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Voices

Culture Dish: Promoting Diversity in Science Writing

Image courtesy of Klari Reis - www.klariart.com

The most persistent — and infuriating — question about diversity in science writing has to be: “Why do we need diversity?” Sometimes that question is followed by this: “Isn’t science color-blind?” To answer that second question first — no, science is most definitely not color-blind, any more than history or politics or literature is color-blind. [...]

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Voices

LEGO Reveals Female Scientist Minifigures

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After much rejoicing at the news last month that LEGO would mass-produce a set of female scientist minifigures, the company has released a prototype of the final set to its original designer, Ellen Kooijman (a.k.a. Alatariel Elensar), who recently posted images of the box and individual parts on her blog. Kooijman, a Dutch isotope geochemist [...]

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Voices

Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist

It’s 11:47 am on the Sunday before Labor Day, and I’m staking out a LEGO store inside a Byzantine shopping mall on the outskirts of Boston. I am here with a coterie of children and parents, the lot of us waiting impatiently while three LEGO associates in black shirts and khakis make their last-minute preparations [...]

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