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Posts Tagged "politics"

@ScientificAmerican

Playing Politics: The Science of ElectionsSA‘s Latest E-Book

Scientific American launched its e-Book program this summer, starting with The Science of Sports: Winning in the Olympics. Each month, we add new titles selected from the most relevant issues facing science today. For October, our newest e-Book reminds readers that politics makes strange bedfellows. This maxim becomes even more vivid when politics is put under [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Political Leaders Gather at D.C. Reception to Discuss Scientific American‘s Special Issue on Cities

Mariette DiChristina at podium, speaking

Congressional staffers, federal agency senior personnel, non-profit leaders and scientific organization executives joined Scientific American Editor in chief Mariette DiChristina at a recent reception to celebrate the magazine’s special issue on cities. “Celebrating cities in many ways is celebrating what is best in us,” DiChristina told the crowd as she kicked off the evening honoring [...]

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Cross-Check

Why Gaddafi’s Death Doesn’t Fill Me With Joy

I was going to let the demise of Muammar Gaddafi pass without comment—after all, what does the murder of this tyrant have to do with science, right? But a bizarre essay in The New York Times on October 26, “Dictators Get the Death They Deserve,” by the historian Simon Windbag—I mean Sebag—Montefiore, has pushed my [...]

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Cross-Check

“Gene-whiz” science strikes again: Researchers discover a liberal gene

Homosexuality is a lifestyle choice. Or so religious conservatives would have us believe. But liberalism is in our genes. Or so researchers at the University of California, San Diego, and Harvard University would have us believe. Yes, the inevitable has happened. Just before Election Day—surely not a coincidence—scientists report an association between liberal political views [...]

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Guest Blog

Where Are the Real Errors in Political Polls?

2012 United States presidential election results by county, on a color spectrum from Democratic blue to Republican red. (Credit: Mark Newman, Department of Physics and Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan)

“Clinton crushes Biden in hypothetical 2016 matchup: Poll.” This was the headline of a MSNBC article on July 17, a full two years before the election in question. In the fine print, NBC reported that the margin of error was around 2 to 5 percent, which would appear to be small enough to trust the [...]

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Guest Blog

In Indonesia, a Worrying Silence on Climate Change

Resilient coral. A colony of table coral that broke down, recovered and is now growing into other direction.

Dive into the limpid waters off Indonesia’s resort island of Bali and you’ll spot the beginnings of an environmental success story. Older reefs are recovering from the devastating coral bleaching of 1998 and 2009. New corals are now taking hold. On shore, local fishermen also see improvement. There are, at long last, more and bigger [...]

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Observations

Scientific American Editor’s Picks for the Top Tech Stories of 2014

Operators aboard Australian navy vessel Ocean Shield move the U.S. Navy’s Bluefin 21 Artemis autonomous underwater vehicle into position for deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter D. Blair/Released.

Wallets, wreckage and digital coin. Before the new year appears, let’s look at some of the most important technology stories Scientific American covered over the past 12 months. North Korean “cyberwar” rhetoric escalates President Barack Obama says the digital attacks in November on Sony Entertainment—allegedly by North Korea or some agent acting on its behalf—did [...]

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Observations

Will Your Research Ever Get the Tax Break That It Deserves?

The innovation industry faces an uncertain future, as long as the United States R&D Tax Credit remains a Congressional roller coaster ride. Innovation should be rewarded and the U.S. government should use federal funds to foster a culture of discovery. Virtually everyone agrees with this broad premise. But, as with many things on Capitol Hill, [...]

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Observations

New GOP Leaders Embrace Science but Don’t Hug Trees

man hugging big tree trunk

Congress can be…chaotic. Last Thursday night, President Obama unveiled plans for immigration reform, and literally challenged Congress to stop him. The next day, Speaker of the House John Boehner said that the GOP would be suing the White House over unconstitutional changes to the Affordable Care Act. It’s a mess. But for science—and scientific research—there’s [...]

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Observations

Ted Cruz Is Not 100 Percent Wrong That Net Neutrality Is ObamaCare for the Internet

President Obama announced his support Monday for net neutrality. And Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz let loose one of his biggest howls, tweeting: “Net Neutrality” is Obamacare for the Internet; the Internet should not operate at the speed of government. — Senator Ted Cruz (@SenTedCruz) November 10, 2014 Cruz really really does not like net [...]

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Observations

Science in a Republican Senate: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Lego version of the 3 characters in the classic movie "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly"

The Republican Party is widely predicted to win control of the Senate as a result of today’s midterm elections. In broadstrokes, that outcome portends a green light for the Keystone XL Pipeline, a blow to the Affordable Care Act and a push for corporate tax reform. But what would a GOP-controlled Senate mean for scientists [...]

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Observations

Smartphone App Takes Morality Science out of the Lab and into the Real World

Image of the Smartphone Experience-Sampling Signal (SMS linking to smartphone survey). Courtesy of Wilhelm Hofmann.

Just when it seems there’s a mobile app for just about everything, psychologists have shown there’s room for one more: they are using smartphones to help them better understand the dynamics of moral and immoral behavior out in the community. A team of U.S., German and Dutch researchers has used Apple iOS, Google Android and [...]

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Observations

Google Gives the Internet Amnesia in Europe

Logo of the Court of Justice of the European Union courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

One of the Internet’s greatest assets is also perhaps its biggest curse—it never forgets. Except in the European Union, where a court last month ruled that people have the right to have certain sensitive information about themselves deleted from Google search results. (pdf) As of Tuesday morning, the region’s most popular search engine has received [...]

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Observations

Fight over Solar Power Returns to White House Roof [Video]

obama-white-house-solar-panels-installed

The sunshine that warms Washington, D.C. is once again generating electricity for the White House. After an absence of nearly 30 years, the Obama administration has announced that a 6.3 kilowatt photovoltaic installation of the “typical size for an American house,” is back on the White House roof and generating power. The Obama administration had [...]

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Observations

26-Minute Execution Deemed “Humane” in Ohio Analysis

Thinkstock/iStock

When Ohio executed convicted rapist and murderer Dennis McGuire in early 2014, it set off a maelstrom of controversy. Ohio used a drug cocktail that appeared to leave McGuire gasping for air for some 11 minutes until he was pronounced dead—26 minutes after the initial injection of his drugs. (Scientific American wrote its May editorial [...]

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Observations

DIY Opioid Antidote Gets Fast FDA Approval

Evzio is designed to be user-friendly

Drug overdoses have become the leading cause of injury in the United States. More people between the ages of 25 and 64 now die from overdose than in car crashes—and prescription drugs are largely to blame. Opioids are particularly dangerous, killing more than 16,000 people in 2010. Prescription opioid overdoses now claim more lives each year [...]

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PsySociety

Mind The Gap: Overestimating Income Inequality

MoneyCash

I’m thrilled to be breaking my dissertation-imposed “mini-hiatus” this week with a series of guest posts over at the BPS Research Digest, where I’ve been asked to take over guest hosting duties for the week and write a few pieces on some recent awesome Social Psych research. First up — recent research has given us [...]

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PsySociety

Weiner’s Wiener? Too perfect to be a coincidence.

AnthonyWeiner

In case you haven’t heard, Carlos Danger — AKA shamed former New York Congressman Anthony Weiner — recently got in trouble once again for exposing his infamous…well, his infamous wiener. Everyone’s had fun ragging on Weiner for his online gaffes. Two years ago, Weiner accidentally exposed a meant-to-be-privately-sent picture of his privates to the entire [...]

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PsySociety

I’m Excited About The Royal Baby (And It’s Okay If You Are Too)

Royal Wedding - The Newlyweds Greet Wellwishers From The Buckingham Palace Balcony

It’s official. Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, gave birth to the “royal baby” on July 22nd, a bouncing baby boy who will one day be the King of the United Kingdom. Although many Americans are thrilled to partake in the Royal Baby fanfare, I’ve also seen a lot of discussions revolving around the questionable morality of [...]

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PsySociety

Fighting Fair: How To Tackle Crucial Conversations On Facebook & Twitter

ArguingPeople

When’s the last time you had an online fight?       Unfortunately, most of us probably won’t have to try particularly hard to recall the last time that this happened.  In a recent survey, 76 percent of almost 2,700 respondents indicated that they have witnessed an argument over social media, 88 percent of respondents [...]

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PsySociety

Fox News Fact Check: Are studies on maternal employment all tinged with political bias?

Fox News

Last week, the anchors at Fox News made headlines when they covered the recent Pew Research Center finding that 40% of all households in America have a female primary breadwinner. About 1/3 of these households consist of two-parent households where the mothers make more money than their husbands, and the remaining 2/3 consist of single [...]

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PsySociety

Fox News Fact Check: Is it bad for lower-income kids if Mom has a job outside the home?

Fairbalanced

Last week, the anchors at Fox News made headlines when they covered the recent Pew Research Center finding that 40% of all households in America have a female primary breadwinner. About 1/3 of these households consist of two-parent households where the mothers make more money than their husbands, and the remaining 2/3 consist of single [...]

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PsySociety

Will changing your Facebook profile picture do anything for marriage equality?

HRC Equality Logo

As SCOTUS debates the constitutionality of Proposition 8 and DOMA this week, Facebook users all over the nation have become part of a burgeoning social media trend. Supporters of marriage equality have been changing their profile pictures to the icon on the left, a version of the Human Rights Campaign logo designed specifically to indicate [...]

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PsySociety

If the Supreme Court is biased, which way does it lean?

Shakespeare

There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. – William Shakespeare, Hamlet According to a poll from the Pew Research Center that has come out just in time for this week’s historic decisions on marriage equality, we should all be concerned. As it turns out, there’s a tremendous amount of bias [...]

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PsySociety

Legalizing same-sex marriage: Politics, personalities, and persuasion tricks.

In honor of the big decisions occurring this week in SCOTUS regarding the constitutionality of Proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act, I am re-posting a slightly edited version of this piece from the archives of my WordPress blog. This was originally posted in June 2011, shortly after New York legalized same-sex marriage. You [...]

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PsySociety

Stalin, Mother Teresa, and Rob Portman: What do they have in common?

File:Rob Portman portrait.jpg

Rob Portman, Republican senator from Ohio and one-time contender for Romney’s would-be VP slot, announced on Friday that he has reversed his very public stance against gay marriage. As the well-known conservative stated in an Op-Ed piece on Friday, he now believes that “if two people are prepared to make a lifetime commitment to love [...]

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Talking back

Are Delta-FosB, or 5-HTT the Obama Genes?

The Atlantic featured a captivating fantasy in its November issue about a scenario to assassinate the U.S. president in 2016 by using a bioweapon specifically tailored to his genetic makeup—a virus that targeted the commander in chief and no one else. A great plot for a Hollywood thriller. But will we really see four years [...]

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