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"physics"184 articles archived since 1845

Strings, Geometry, and the Ultimate Reality: The Debate

Strings, Geometry, and the Ultimate Reality: The Debate

Can strings be the ultimate constituents of the universe–more fundamental than matter or energy, and even than space or time? If they’re not made of matter or energy, what are they, then?

July 30, 2011 — Davide Castelvecchi

The Top 10 Space and Physics Stories of 2014

From humanity’s first, flawed foray to the surface of a comet to the celebrated discovery of (and less celebrated skepticism about) primordial gravitational waves, 2014 has brought some historic successes and failures in space science and physics.

December 22, 2014 — Lee Billings

Physics Week in Review: August 2, 2014

Looking for a few good popular math books? In the latest New York Times Book Review, I look at five terrific recent ones: Jordan Ellenberg's How Not to Be Wrong, David J.

August 2, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette
Physics Week in Review: August 9, 2014

Physics Week in Review: August 9, 2014

The big news in space science this week: the Rosetta spacecraft catches its comet! Here’s what comes next. Why does it take 10 years to catch a comet?

August 9, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette

What Are Black Hole Firewalls? [Video]

Black holes break theories. These sites of extremely large masses in extremely small spaces invoke both of the behemoths of modern physics—general relativity (which rules over large masses) and quantum mechanics (which reigns in small spaces).

March 24, 2015 — Clara Moskowitz
How to See a Black Hole: Introducing Dark Star Diaries

How to See a Black Hole: Introducing Dark Star Diaries

The image you see here is a computer-generated model of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which we call Sagittarius A*. More precisely, it is a model of the "shadow" that Sagittarius A*, with its mass of four million suns, should cast.

March 27, 2014 — Seth Fletcher

This Is What We Don’t Know About The Universe

In recent days I’ve had some interesting conversations. There’s a giddiness going around, related to an outpouring of science love – the kind you get from President Obama introducing TV science shows, the kind that has wonderful visuals, but is, well, a wee bit simplistic (a sin that none of us could ever, ever be [...]

March 12, 2014 — Caleb A. Scharf
Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

This is a guest post by my friend Pinkesh Patel, a data scientist at Facebook. Pinkesh has a PhD in physics from Caltech during which he worked on LIGO, the gravitational wave detector.

April 3, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Should physicists stop looking for fundamental laws?

Physics, unlike biology or geology, was not considered to be a historical science until now. Physicists have prided themselves on being able to derive the vast bulk of phenomena in the universe from first principles.

January 21, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
The Fingerprints the Higgs Leaves Behind

The Fingerprints the Higgs Leaves Behind

Tomorrow, the Nobel prize in physics will most likely be awarded to Peter Higgs and Francois Englert. Along with other researchers, the two physicists are credited with the 1964 introduction of the then-theoretical Higgs field—a fluid that permeates every corner of the universe and gives each particle a distinct mass.

October 7, 2013 — Rachel Feltman
Manh(a)ttan Recap: An Appetite for Self-Destruction [SPOILERS]

Manh(a)ttan Recap: An Appetite for Self-Destruction [SPOILERS]

The residents of the Los Alamos base camp receive a special visitor in this week’s episode of Manh(a)ttan — none other than Niels Bohr, he of the infamous model of the atom and one of the unquestioned giants of 20th century physics.

August 18, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette
Manh(a)ttan Recap: The Human Cost of Wartime Scientific Progress [SPOILERS]

Manh(a)ttan Recap: The Human Cost of Wartime Scientific Progress [SPOILERS]

Last week’s episode of Manh(a)ttan closed with a bombshell — the shooting of physicist Sid Liao, who was being interrogated on suspicion of leaking classified documents — and as expected, this week’s episode (“The Hive”) dealt with the fallout from that cataclysmic event, both personally and professionally.

August 13, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette
Physics Week in Review: August 16, 2014

Physics Week in Review: August 16, 2014

This week on Virtually Speaking Science, I chatted with astrophysicist Katie Freese, author of a new book, The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter.

August 16, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette

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