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Posts Tagged "peer review"

Information Culture

Introduction to Traditional Peer Review

Peer review was introduced to scholarly publication in 1731 by the Royal Society of Edinburgh, which published a collection of peer-reviewed medical articles. Despite this early start, in many scientific journal publications the editors had the only say on whether an article will be published or not until after World War II. “Science and The [...]

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Information Culture

Your theory is rubbish (but I won’t say it out loud)

Science seems to be full of controversies and conflicts; famous scientists willing to kill and be killed for their pet theories, former students challenging the views of their academic “parents” and so on. My favorite biology professor used to tell about the time when his post-doc advisor, after a lecture given by his former post-doc [...]

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Information Culture

Interview with Richard Price, Academia.edu CEO

Dr. Richard Price

This post is a bit different from what Bonnie and I usually post in this blog – an interview with Dr. Richard Price, founder and CEO of Academia.edu, a social network for researchers.  Academia.edu is a San Francisco-based start-up, which currently has 1.8 million registered users and 4.5 million unique visitors a month, with about [...]

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Information Culture

Peer review makes science better

Part of what makes the process of science so interesting is the part where scientists invite criticism. It’s right there in the scientific method, in the part where we have to see if other experiments confirm original results. Or, as David Ng states in his “Introduction to the Scientific Method, by way of Chewbacca,” this [...]

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Observations

Young Scientists Encourage the Public to Demand Peer Review

It seems that more and more policy makers, advocacy groups, advertisers and media pundits are making claims based on science: this kind of potion is good for your health, that chemical is bad for the environment, this new technology can reduce crime. How is the public supposed to know what to believe? The peer review [...]

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Observations

Controversial caterpillar-evolution study formally rebutted

Butterfly metamorphosis from caterpillar

A contentious paper suggesting that butterflies and caterpillars descended from different ancestors has been rebutted in the same journal in which the original, controversial research appeared. In August, retired biologist Donald Williamson of the University of Liverpool in England posited in an online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS) paper that the [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Solomon Snyder on academic publishing: ask for adequate, not exhaustive, documentation

Renowned neuropharmacologist Solomon Snyder has a thought-provoking take on what seems to be one of the two evils that has plagued modern academia: publication (the other one is the job market). I have previously blogged about the increasing conservatism of academic publishing myself, and in this case “conservatism” also translates to “excessive rigor”. Snyder starts [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Peer review – Pitfalls, possibilities, perils, promises *: #scio13

At this year’s ScienceOnline (un)conference, Jarrett Byrnes from the University of Massachusetts, Boston and I will be moderating a session on open science and peer review. Peer review clearly faces new and urgent challenges with the advent of online science journalism and writing that can criticize and even bypass the process. Can the traditional model [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Computational research in the era of open access: Standards and best practices

This is an opinion piece I wrote for a new planned journal on open computational research that for one reason or another failed to take off. Hopefully the journal will be resurrected or another will take its place since this is an important topic. Simulation and modeling have now become robust and frequent paradigms in [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Misconduct, not error, is the source of most retracted papers

There’s a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that should make the scientific community sit up and do a little pondering. Researchers from the University of Washington, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the firm MediCC! analyze retracted papers from 1977 onwards and investigate the reasons for their retractions. The [...]

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The Curious Wavefunction

Chemistry blogging and journalism: Eat the fruit, don’t count the trees

I have been blogging about chemistry and related topics since 2004. Since then I have had the chance to witness the rise of the chemistry blogosphere. What started as a small, loose collection of opinionated men and women has turned into a group of serious and well-informed bloggers who blog with authority and nuance. Partly [...]

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