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Posts Tagged "open access"

Absolutely Maybe

Open access 2013: A year of gaining momentum

Cartoon of old school closed science library

Was this the year open access for science reached critical mass? One hypothesis suggests that a transformative group needs to reach one-third to be prominent and persisting. Rogers’ theory on the diffusion of innovations that will eventually reach saturation level says the first 2.5% are innovators. By the time you get to 16% the phase [...]

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But Seriously...

Linda Avey on Open Access and 23andMe

Linda Avey

With 23andMe in the news this week, I thought it was a good time to share something I’d never published before. It’s a short interview with Linda Avey, co-founder of 23andMe. I spoke with Linda a couple years ago at the 2011 Open Science Summit in Mountain View, CA. I asked her a few questions [...]

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Illusion Chasers

Happy Birthday PeerJ!

504px-Jan_van_Eyck_059

Tomorrow marks the anniversary of the paradigm-shifting new journal, PeerJ.

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Illusion Chasers

The Evolution of Scientific Dissemination: PeerJ Rises

PeerJ is the next evolution of the journal. It’s open access, but instead of charging the authors an arm and a leg, it’s relatively cheap to publish

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Information Culture

Take a stand for public access to taxpayer funded research

In my first post here at Information Culture, I made the argument that in order for science to progress, the results of scientific studies must be shared with others. One of the challenges facing scientists in the modern world is that this research is typically published in journals that individuals and libraries must pay to [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

An Elegy for Aaron

This post is in honor of Aaron Swartz. I had long considered posting my book as open access but had hesitated in doing so, even though I have long been an enthusiast about OLPC and Creative Commons.  Aaron’s tragic death prompted my urgent reconsideration and offering.   For me, it is the pictures of Aaron, [...]

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Observations

Science and the Public Parlay: Come a Little Bit Closer

BOSTON—Rarer than hen’s teeth is a bill in Congress that has bipartisan support. But such legislation exists, and if passed would open up a semi-secret world. The law—the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act—would ensure that research articles based on taxpayer-supported projects are freely available online for the public to read. FASTR [...]

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Observations

CT Scans Reveal Early Human Fossils inside Rock

Two Australopithecus sediba skeletons from Malapa

Readers of this blog may have noticed that I’m obsessed with a recently discovered member of the human family tree: the nearly two million-year-old Australopithecus sediba, discovered at a site called Malapa near Johannesburg.  There are several reasons for this fixation. For one thing it’s new—it isn’t every day that a previously unknown human relative [...]

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Observations

Could a Renewed Push for Access to Fossil Data Finally Topple Paleoanthropology’s Culture of Secrecy?

sharing fossil casts

In a hotel ballroom in Portland, Or., this past April, the tables were laid not with silverware and china, but replicas of some of the most important human fossils in the world. Seasoned paleoanthropologists and graduate students alike milled among them, pausing to examine a cutmarked Neandertal skull from Croatia, the bizarre foot bones of [...]

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